Friday, February 25, 2005

Shamless NAXALS demonstrate outside Nepalese consulate office

NAXALISM = TERRORISM

http://naxalwatch.blogspot.com

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Naxal demonstration outside Nepalese consulate office

[India News]: Kolkata, Feb 24 : Naxalites of the CPI(ML-Liberation) today demonstrated before the Nepalese consulate here coinciding with the visit of the Nepalise Tourism tourism minister Buddhi Raj Bajracharya to the metropolis.

The naxals shouted slogans like 'withdraw emergency and restore democracy in Nepal'.

The protestors who submited a memorandum to an oficial of the consulte also demanded immediate release of arrested political leaders and lifting of restrictions on the media in the Himalyan Kingdom.

Police said the programme passed off peacefully. PTI

Thursday, February 24, 2005

Put down Naxalite menace with a firm hand

Title: Put down Naxalite menace with a firm hand
Author: M.V.Kamath

Publication: Free Press Journal

Date: February 24, 2005



Terrorism is not unique to India. It exists in various forms in many
countries throughout the world. What comes as a surprise is to learn that
a shocking kind of anti-social behaviour has in recent times been
cropping up in, of all places, Britain. According to The Economist (5
February) "over the past decade, anti-social behaviour hellish neighbours,
beggars, teenage gangs has become a big worry in Britain". How come?
According to Prime Minister Tony Blair, the origins of anti-social
behaviour can be traced to 1960s.

As he explained, that decade "spawned a group of young people who were
brought up without parental discipline, without proper role models and
without any sense of responsibility to or for others." The country is
paying for that now. So how is the State responding to this new
situation? The Economist says that the State has now given itself new powers to
deal with minor offences and other crimes which are scarcely less
draconian than those to deal with suspected terrorism.

The government has created a new set of rules, chief among being the
Anti-Social Behaviour Order or ASBO. Says the journal: "Troublemakers as
young as ten years old can be barred from entering neighbourhoods,
ringing bells, using public transport and mobile phones or even uttering
certain words, for a minimum period of two years. Securing an ASBO is
easy. Hearsay evidence, for instance, is admissible in court. The
consequences of stepping out of line are weighty: a maximum of five years in
prison for doing something that is not necessarily an offence in law. Not
surprisingly, such a powerful weapon is popular: more than a thousant
ASDOs were handed out in the first half of 2004".

Obtaining an ASDO is so easy. Fewer than one in 70 applications are
turned down that they have been used to tackle a wide range of undesirable
behaviour. ASDOs allow the police to nail people for offences too minor
to be criminal. Even more relevantly, ASDOs allow the police to bypass
the normal procedures of criminal justice when they suspect somebody of
serious criminal activity, but can't prove it.

A suspected drug dealer, for instance, can be banned from using a
mobile phone-a crucial tool, in his supposed profession. when he is caught
doing so, he can be jailed. And all this in England, land of freedom.
Does it have any lesson for India, presently under attack not from
ordinary anti-social elements, but by criminals and thugs wielding guns and
demanding money under threat of death? Those are the so-called Naxalites
who have been playing havoc in the country side under the pretext of
defending the rights of the poor. According to one reliable source, the
Naxalite movement has been spreading fast and registered growth in 156
districts in 13 States by 2004.

We now learn that Naxalites are in command in 170 districts in 15
States at the present time and are expanding "at an average rate of two
districts per week". And they have been causing tremendous trouble. Armed
men are moving around unchecked by the police; they invade rich homes
and demand money. According to one source in Andhra Pradesh alone, the
Naxalites have raised over Rs. 300 crores. The money is apparently being
used to buy guns and ammunition. This is the time when the
BJP-sponsored POTA should have been brought under operation but a spineless
Congress-led government in Delhi had it scrapped. Now nobody knows how to
handle the Naxalites.

In Andhra Pradesh the government of Y. S. Rajasekhara Reddy is running
scared. The Congress government had declared a truce eight months ago
but now the Naxalites are accusing the government of reneging on it and
resorting to "fake encounters". Reddy has been threatened with death.
And, no doubt, the Maoists will carry out that threat if they find it
expedient to do so.

In fact they blasted the house of a Congress leader and torched a bus
in Guntur hours before Reddy was expected there. In a statement issued
in Guntur, a Maoist leader said: "Reddy will pay dearly for his
anti-Maoist and anti-people policies". All that Reddy could do was to appeal to
the Maoists to give up arms to facilitate another round of peace talks.
It is the most shocking exhibition of weakness. But then Prime Minister
Manmohan Singh in Delhi doesn't seem to have any clue as to what is
happening in Naxal-infested districts. He has invited the Opposition to
come forward with its suggestions on ways to tackle the Naxalite problem.

Is this how the Central government plans to govern the country? The
Naxalites have been behaving like savages. On Friday, 11 February, a
Naxalite gang surrounded a police van and started throwing grenades at the
unsuspecting police men inside killing six of them. This seems to be
their standard procedure whether in Bihar, Orissa, Andhra Pradesh or
Karnataka. This particular incident took place in Karnataka in a village not
far from Bangalore.

Nobody has so far been arrested. The response of the Karnataka Chief
Minister N. Dharam Singh is to say that his government would deal with
the Naxalites "in a ruthless manner". He has announced the setting up of
two anti-Naxal squads, each squad comprising 250 policemen headed by a
Deputy Inspector General of Police. One squad will be dealing with the
Naxal menace in the districts of Shimoga, Udupi, Mangalore and
Chikamaglur and the other would be deployed in Bidar, Gulbarga, Tumkur,
Raichur, Bellary and Kolar districts. From all accounts the Naxals are purely
indigenous and are not supported by the ISI of Pakistan or the
Government of China.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has expressed his deep concern about a
"virtual collapse of law and order in view of extortion demands, display
of arms, encroachment on public property and the militant rhetoric of
Naxal leaders at rallies and meetings". What is shocking is that no
Naxal leader seems to have so far been arrested. And, to the best of one's
knowledge, no study has been made of the background to the Naxal
uprising. This uprising is covert. It is unlike the freedom movement in India
of pre-Independence days, violent. So had is the situation that in
Hyderabad city, an armed Naxalite could walk into a jeweller's shop and
demand cash without a policeman coming to the rescue of the unfortunate
citizen.

Can such an `uprising' be put down by holding talks as suggested by
Union Home Minister Shivraj Patil? Over the last three decades Maoist
violence has taken a toll of over 6,000 people including 1,000 policemen.
Despite that, the Congress insists on playing up to the Leftists. Does
anyone seriously believe that the Naxalites will come to the table for
talks? If we are to believe the Union Home Minister, he will treat the
Naxalites "like family members" if only they will discard the path of
violence. We have yet to come across a more naive Home Minister.

If Naxalites only wanted land for the yet to come across a more naive
Home Minister. If Naxalites only wanted land for the poor, they could
have adopted Gandhian methods of non-violence. In the past, especially in
Karnataka, land had indeed been taken away from rich landlords for
distribution among the landless peasants, under the guidance of Devraj Urs.

The landlords were given a pittance by way of compensation but there
was no violence and the transfer of lands took place peacefully. The
Naxalites have no use for non-violence. They are a special breed. The
trouble is that while the universe may be expanding, the earth is not and
there is only so much of cultivable land available in any of the 28
states. There is no way land can be equitably distributed among the rural
population. But is Naxalite `justice' to be confined only to the rural
landless?

A time, surely will come when Naxalites would want distribution of
wealth among the urban poor and where will all this stop? No one seems to
have any answer. One is not sure whether even the Naxals themselves know
where their vicious philosophy will ultimately take them. In Nepal they
claim to be against monarchy.

Monarchy is not necessarily an evil thing. And even by killing the
current incumbent to the Kathmandu throne and establishing a Maoist raj the
Maoists will quickly find themselves at a loss as to how to deliver
`social justice'. What is social justice, anyway? Lenin, Stalin and their
successors tried to deliver it. All that they could do was to establish
a dictatorship that ultimately collapsed.

The experiment was tried in Maoist China and it failed there too. Our
Naxalites have obviously never heard of the Bourbons who learnt nothing
and forgot nothing. It is a pity. There are no quick fixes to our
economic problems. A people can grow more crops, but a government cannot
grow more land. The answer to poverty is not killing people, burning
buses, and indulging in extortion but in birth control and diminishing
population. It is a long-term measure. The Chinese have after much suffering
learnt the futility of Maoist ways; our Naxalites have yet to learn
their lesson.

In the end they will only invite State violence with a vengeance and
then they can't possibly blame any one for what follows. There are no
short solutions for long term problems. The Chinese have realised that.
Shanghai is only a show piece. The real China lies elsewhere in the
provinces beyond where poverty is just as grinding as anywhere else. Half a
century of dictatorship call it Maoism has not greatly changed the face
of rural China. Both China and India have to make efforts to reduce
their populations drastically from over a billion to somewhere between 450
to 600 million. It is, alas, a long-drawn process but that is the only
worthwhile goal to accomplish.

The Naxalites must understand this. If they fail to, then the State
must make them understand through strong-arm methods. Our Naxalites must
remember that those who live by the sword will perish by sword. There is
a limit to a state's patience. The Naxalites are trying it sorely. If
they don't realise their limits, one can comfortably predict a
middle-class counter-revolution that could spell the Naxalites' doom.

If Britain can adopt strong methods to contain its anti-social
elements, India can adopt equally strong anti-terrorist methods to contain the
Naxalites. If the Naxalites do not understand where and how to draw
their laxman rekha they may rue the day when they took to mindless
violence. Wisdom lies in knowing one's limits.

Wednesday, February 23, 2005

Naxals behead tribal for Voting

Beheaded for casting his vote:-

Ranchi February 23, 2005 2:27:48 PM IST

Ranchi, Feb 23 : He was the first to vote at a polling booth in
Jharkhand. But for his small democratic act, Jeevanlal Mahto met a grisly end - shot, decapitated and his severed head displayed as a warning to others by Maoist rebels.

Police said the 25-year-old youth was killed Tuesday in Tigrakala
village of Giridih district - about 230 km from here - for defying the Maoist poll boycott call even as the state held its third and final round of polling Wednesday.

Mahto was apparently the first person to caste his vote in his village Feb 3 in the first phase of polls.

On Tuesday, he was at the village market when five people appeared on two bikes and caught him by his hair, saying: "How did you dare to vote. You are a police informer."

According to eyewitnesses, he was first shot and then another Maoist rebel beheaded him with a sharp edged weapon. The guerrillas roamed in the market with the head in their hand and later left it on the road, police said.

The killing has created panic among those who voted despite the boycott call by the Maoists.

The first two phases of elections were held in Maoist-dominated
districts Feb 3 and Feb 15. The polling percentage was 50 to 60 percent in both phases, irking the rebels.

Senior officials and security forces are camping in the area to boost the confidence of people who have been scared by the killing.
Maoist guerrillas are active in 16 of the 22 districts of the state. Nearly 515 people, including 210 security personnel, have been killed since creation of the state in November 2000.

(IANS)

Over 26,000 criminals nabbed in special police drive

[India News]: Patna, Feb 22 : Fourteen dreaded criminals have been killed in encounters and over 26,000 anti-socials including Naxal extremists arrested so far in special security drive of the Bihar police during past one month to conduct peaceful assembl elections, police said today.

Inspector General of Police (Headquarters) Neelmani told PTI altogether 20 encounters took place during past one month in which 14 dreaded criminals were killed at separate places and 26,218 anti-socials including 73 naxal extremists have been arrested across Bihar.

Around 844 firearms were seized and 37 illegal minigun factories unearthed during the period from different areas, he said.
The IG said that regular patrolling were being conducted across the state to nab the criminals. PTI

Death toll in Nagpur blast goes up to seven


NAGPUR, FEB 23 ,2005 (PTI)

The death toll in the Naxal ambush on a police party at Dhodraj in Bhamragarh in Gadchiroli district has gone up to seven after two policemen succumbed to their injuries today, police said here.

Five policemen were killed on the spot and 12 injured when a police party, on a routine patrol, was ambushed by a group of Naxalites last evening.

The ultras blew up the police van after triggering a landmine blast in the deep forest on Maharashtra-Chhattisgarh border.

The dead have been identified as SI Umakant Zarkar, ASI Shyamrao Tadse (ASI), head constable Vishwanath Singram, Pandu Atram, Prakash Meshram, Purushottam Meshram and Dinkar Atram (all constables).

Six of the seriously injured policemen and the civilian driver have been admitted to Government Medical College hospital here while the others were being treated at Aheri, police said.

IGP Pankaj Gupta had rushed to Gadchiroli last night, police added.

Talks only if you give up arms: CM tells Naxals

Talks only if you give up arms: CM tells Naxals

BANGALORE, (UNI)


Laying a pre-condition for holding talks with naxalite groups, Karnataka Chief Minister N Dharam Singh today said the government was ready to come to the negotiating table, only if they give up arms.

Talking to newspersons here, he said ''until they give up arms no talks are possible.'' Earlier, on the sidelines of the inaugural of the EMC Corporation's Development Centre, he said the police would continue combing operations in the naxalite-infested areas to protect the lives of people. Patrolling had been stepped up along the Andhra Pradesh border and in the coastal regions.

On the rejection of talks by the naxalites with the Government, he said ''if they come with their socio-economic problems, the Government is ready to solve them. Otherwise, it is not bothered.''

He said the combing operation had been stepped up along the Andhra Pradesh border and in the coastal regions.

Mr Singh said Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Y S Rajashekhar Reddy had also taken action to stop ultras from taking shelter in Karnataka from his state.

He said the Government would approach the Centre if necessary to handle naxalism, which was becoming a national problem of late.

Tuesday, February 22, 2005

Naxalites ambushed a police patrol party : 5 KILLED

Press Trust of India

Nagpur, February 22, 200521:24 IST



Five policemen were killed and 12 others injured when a group of Naxalites ambushed a police patrol party at Dhodraj near Bhamragarah in Gadchiroli district of Maharashtra, a senior police official said.

"A police party of 17 people was blown off by a landmine blast leading to death of five on the spot while other 12 were being evacuated in a rescue and relief operation", Gadchiroli SP Shirish Jain said.

He said the blast occurred at around 5.30 pm when the police party was on a routine patrol and crossing a river in Dhodraj on Maharashtra-Chhattisgarh border.

The injured are being brought to Gadchiroli, Jain said adding the names of deceased could not be known immediately



The district is intensely infested with naxalites of People's War Group (PWG ). These naxalites usually operate in the remote and fur flung interior parts of the district where access is very complicated due to difficult terrain and dense forest.

The southern part of the district mainly comprising Sironcha, Aheri, Etapalli and Bhamragad are infested with the activities of naxalites as these areas are in possession of thick forest and are close the border of Madhya Pradesh and Andhra Pradesh.

The police personnel have to undergo a lot hardship and play a major role in the district to keep the naxalites at bay, in comparison to the other districts in Maharashtra. Apart from this, the district police also initiates many noble schemes like Janjagran Melawa, in which the tribals are invited and they are acquainted with the various government schemes which they can very well avail of. The people are also given free medical aid and made cautions of naxal propaganda through which the innocent people are cheated to work for them.

http://gadchiroli.nic.in/sp18.htm

Contact Numbers of SP

Beware! Naxal hit-squads prowling the city

TIMES NEWS NETWORK[ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 06, 2005 11:35:15 PM ]



HYDERABAD: A high alert was sounded in the city on Sunday morning after intelligence agencies reportedly detected the movement of a few naxalite 'action teams' (hit squads) tasked with eliminating some 'big targets'.


Sources said plainclothesmen have fanned out in the city to round up the hit squads. Both the Hyderabad and Cyberabad police have been directed to provide additional security to all possible Maoist targets.

Consequently, security around ministers' residences, the state police headquarters and MLA Quarters has been increased, while politicians from naxalite-affected areas are being told to watch their step while visiting public places.

According to sketchy details available with the police, at least two naxalite action teams are prowling the city, each with three or four members carrying small weapons. Police are yet to assess who their targets could be.

Sources said all the roads used by the chief minister, home minister and former chief minister Chandrababu Naidu are being scanned a few hours in advance to detect any explosives or mines.

They said Naidu continues to figure at the top of the Maoist hit-list, but the government's recent tough stance against the extremists has put Y S Rajasekhara Reddy in his predecessor's company.


A senior police officer said the Maoists have now become desperate to hit a 'big target' to create a sensation.

Monday, February 21, 2005

Police begin anti-Naxal operations in Karnataka -- GOOD JOB

Chief Minister N Dharam Singh spoke of complete coordination between the State and Andhra Pradesh to tackle Naxal menace.

BANGALORE/ TUMKUR, DHNS:


Karnataka police on Saturday conducted combing operations against Naxals at hilly regions near the vicinity of Venkatammanahalli in Pavagada taluk, where the extremists killed seven policemen.

The Andhra Pradesh police carried out the operation on their side. “It was not a joint combing operation, but we had informed them about our activity.
The combing will continue,” Mr S N Borkar, DG & IGP, told Deccan Herald in Bangalore.

The operation was based on the popular belief that the Kamanadurga hill is the hideout of the Naxals.

Accompanied by ADGP (Law and Order) Subhash Bharani, Mr Borkar visited the police camp at Venkatammanahalli where the police camp was attacked, reviewed the progress into the investigation of the case, met people to ask about the security in the region and inspected the security at the police stations in the region.

“I am satisfied with the overall progress,” Mr Borkar, who returned to Bangalore on Saturday evening, said.

Visit cancelled
However, the visit of several political leaders was cancelled due to security reasons, in view of the combing operations. Chief Minister N Dharam Singh said there will be “complete coordination” between the State and Andhra Pradesh all along the boundary of the two States.

Terming an official delegation’s visit to Andhra on tackling the Naxal menace together as “successful,” the chief minister said that joint operations will be taken up.

He was responding to reporters’ queries after a review meeting with the bomb disposal squad and senior Home Department officials at his official residence Anugraha.

Govt favours "multi-pronged" approach to solve Naxal problem

[India News]: Raipur, Feb 20 : The Centre today advocated a "multi-pronged" approach in finding a solution to the problem of Naxalism, saying force should be used only if dialogue and social and economic empowerment failed to bring the "misguided" people into the mainstream.

"It has to be a multi-pronged approach. You can't try to tackle this problem just with the help of force or you can't expect that only by talking this problem can be solved," Home Minister Shivraj Patil told a press conference after a high-level meeting here to discuss the security situation in the state.

"Wherever it is necessary to talk, you should talk (but) you should not treat them as enemies but as persons who are angry, misguided and not understanding the situation," he said. ( ARE THEY MISGUIDED ???)

Asserting that some people take up arms because of a feeling that they are being discriminated against economically, socially and politically, Patil said the Government should first try to correct this perception.

"Even after that if action is necessary, it has to be taken," he said.

The meeting was attended by Minister of State for Home S Reghupathy, Chattisgarh Chief Minister Raman Singh, state Home Minister Brijmohan Aggarwal, Additional Secretary (Border Management) K P Singh, Director General CRPF J K Sinha and other senior officials of Central and state governments.

Stressing that the Government had the "strength which will be used if necessary," he said this should be the first course of action. PTI


Centre assures all help to deal with naxal problem:

[India News]: Raipur, Feb 20 : Union Home Minister Shivraj Patil today assured Chhattisgarh government of all possible assistance in dealing with the naxalite problem in the state.

"The Centre is with Chhattisgarh on dealing with naxalite problems," he told a high-level meeting on internal security at Chief Minister Raman Singh's residence here, official sources told PTI.

Patil gave the assurance after the Chief Minister pointed out that development was not possible without peace and asked for adequate Central assistance to deal with the naxalite menace, the sources said.

Singh and state Home Minister Brijmohan Agarwal pointed out that the state needed additional police force and weapons to deal with the situation.

Patil also assured the Centre's assistance if the state government decides to hold talks with the ultras.

Expressing satisfaction over law and order situation in the state, he assured to provide additional forces, armoured vehicle and assistance for mordernisation of police forces in the state.

Union Minister of State for Home S Regupathy and senior officials also attended the meeting. PTI
http://news.newkerala.com/india-news/?action=fullnews&id=75158

Sunday, February 20, 2005

Chattisgarh calls for integrated action plan to fight Naxalism

Chattisgarh calls for integrated action plan to fight Naxalism:

[India News]: Raipur, Feb 20 : Underlining the need for a "national level" solution to the Naxalite problem, Chattisgarh government today asked the Centre to evolve an integrated action plan involving all states afflicted by the scourge and formulate uniform guidelines for peace talks.

"Naxalism affects 140 districts of the country and 30 per cent of its population across 10 states. It cannot be treated as a problem of Chattisgarh alone and the solution has to be found at the national level," Chief Minister Raman Singh told reporters before a high-level meeting on internal security chaired by visiting Union Home Minister Shivraj Patil.

"We are feeling the need for an integrated action plan in which all affected states coordinate with each other and the Centre gives its guidance," he added.

Singh emphasised that uniformity in guidelines for dialogue and surrender policy should be evolved before talking to the naxal groups.

"The guidelines should be clarified as to what extent the state governments can discuss with these groups," he said.

Singh said his government had already made a public appeal to groups like Maoist Communist Centre (MCC) and People's War Group (PWG) active in the state to come for talks, but had not got any response so far.

"We are watching the developments in the peace talks between Andhra Pradesh government and the naxalites as most leaders of these groups stay there. In the meantime, our doors are open," he said. PTI

Govt for holistic approach to solve Naxal problem

Govt for holistic approach to solve Naxal problem

Press Trust of India

Raipur, February 20, 2005|20:25 IST


The Centre on Sunday advocated a "multi-pronged" approach in finding a solution to the problem of Naxalism, saying force should be used only if dialogue and social and economic empowerment fail to bring the "misguided" people into the mainstream.

"It has to be a multi-pronged approach. You can't try to tackle this problem just with the help of force or you can't expect that only by talking this problem can be solved," Home Minister Shivraj Patil said after a high-level meeting to discuss the security situation in the state.

"Wherever it is necessary to talk, you should talk (but) you should not treat them as enemies but as persons who are angry, misguided and not understanding the situation," he said.

Asserting that some people take up arms because of a feeling that they are being discriminated against economically, socially and politically, Patil said the Government should first try to correct this perception.

"Even after that if action is necessary, it has to be taken," he said.

The meeting was attended by Minister of State for Home S Reghupathy, Chattisgarh Chief Minister Raman Singh, state Home Minister Brijmohan Aggarwal, Additional Secretary (Border Management) KP Singh, Director General CRPF JK Sinha and other senior officials of Central and state governments.

Stressing that the Government had the "strength, which will be used if necessary," he said this should be the first course of action.

Announcing full support of the Centre to "whatever work is done by the state government to solve the problem," Patil said how the task could be carried forward and the Union Government's role in it would be discussed.

"But we believe that the work has to be done by the state government," he added.

Patil said the need for a unified command had not yet been felt, but if it was necessary at some time in the future, it could be adopted as had been done in Jammu and Kashmir and the some states in Northeast.

Asked about Raman Singh's plea for an integrated action plan involving all Naxal-infested states, Patil said the Chief Minister had not brought it up during the meeting, which he described as "very good".

Patil said 90 per cent of the people of the state do not believe in violence and the people's believe in democracy and the Government's strength would stem the problem.