Saturday, August 06, 2005

Illegal gun factory busted in Patna

:-
Patna | August 06, 2005 8:28:39 PM IST


Patna police today busted off an illegal arms factory in Naubatpura locality today following a tip off and took four people into custody.

Large number of countrymade arms were recovered in the raid.

The factory churning out country made pistols, guns and revolvers was operating in the Sheikhpura village which lies in the Naxal affected Naubatpura area. The police suspect that the factory used to supply arms to the Maoist rebels.

" We have information that the last two of the arrested Kamandal Mochi and Ramsharan Mochi might have relations with the Naxalites. It is being probed. It is clear that they were into the trade for years. The total recovery includes 16 countrymade pistols and five rifles, 21 firearms in total. The equipment used in the manufacture of the fiearms have been seized. The factory has completely been destroyed," said Nayar Husnain Khan, SSP Patna.

The accused confess that they used to supply the arms at a price.

" We sold the pistols for Rs 300 to Rs 400 a piece. We never supplied to the Naxalites," said Sanjee Sharma, accused.

The police are investigating the arms trail to establish where the arms were being supplied.

The latest round of police action comes after a stern instruction from the Election Commission to crack down on criminals in the state ahead of the coming assembly polls. (ANI)

Andhra Pradesh Police killed 2 NAXALS

Indo-Asian News Service


Hyderabad, Aug 6 (IANS) In less than a week, CPI-ML Janashakti received yet another blow when police gunned down two extremists of the left-wing outfit in Warangal town Saturday.

Police said the two men, who were riding a bicycle, opened fire on a police patrol around 1 am. Both were killed in retaliatory fire.

They have been identified as Warangal district committee member Ravi and Vikram, an action team member of the outfit.

Police on Thursday had killed four Janashakti guerillas in a gun battle.

Meanwhile, terming the gun battles as stage-managed, the outfit has given a bandh call in the district on Aug 10.

Janashakti, the second most powerful extremist group after CPI (Maoist), has suffered a series of setbacks since the peace process between the Maoists and the state government broke down in January this year.

Four of its extremists, including state leader Riyaz Khan, who had participated in the peace talks with government, were killed in a gun battle in Karimnagar district July 1.

Maoist violence in the state has claimed more than 6,000 lives since 1969.


--Indo-Asian News Service

Orissa Govt under fire over law and order

Saturday August 6 2005 12:41 IST

BHUBANESWAR: Opposition on Friday put the Government on the defensive over the law and order situation in the State.

Participating in a motion on the law and order situation moved by Government chief whip Kishore Mohanty, deputy leader of Opposition Narsingh Mishra took a dig at Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik for claiming that the situation at Kendrapara is satisfactory even after imposition of curfew.

Blaming the district administration for the situation at Kendrapara, the Congress leader said the district headquarters town which was simmering finally exploded. He accused the District Collector and Superintendent of Police (SP) of promoting criminals.

Referring to his recent visit to the district as part of a Congress team, Mishra said, ‘‘Everyone we talked there spoke against the Collector and SP. But the Chief Minister is protecting the two despite the fact that the people have lost confidence on them.’’

‘‘What is the special interest of the Chief Minister for allowing the Collector to continue there even after his removal by the Election Commission during the last election,’’ he wondered.

A high-level inquiry has been conducted against the SP and the report has been submitted, he said and sought to know why the Chief Minister is sitting on the report.

The law and order situation in other parts of the State is equally bad, he said and referred to the lock-up deaths at Sahidnagar police station and Kuchinda. Very soon Orissa will be another Bihar if the situation continues, he said.

Initiating the motion, the Government chief whip dismissed Opposition allegation of political interference in police administration. Increasing Naxal activities is the major problem of the State, but the Centre is not helping the State in tackling the situation, he added.

The Centre not only turned down State’s proposal for construction of a National Highway from Vijaywada to Ranchi but also is demanding the cost of CRPF deployment in the Naxal-affected areas, he said.

Defending the Government, Kalpataru Das (BJD) said crime rate in the State is much lower than the national average. The Chief Minister cannot be blamed for the naxal activities because the ultras are taking shelter in jungles.

However, the debate became lively when Pratap Sarangi (BJP) and Narayan Reddy (CPI) traded charges. When Reddy attacked the Saffron party, several BJP legislators were on their feet. When Sananda Marandi (BJP) took away the microphone of Reddy other BJP members shouted at the CPI leader. Nothing could be heard in the din. The debate remained inconclusive and will continue on Monday.

Friday, August 05, 2005

The lost generation of children abducted and forced into war

From Catherine Philp in Kathmandu



ASHA had never met a Maoist rebel. She had only heard stories of them, how they fought the army in savage battles and whisked children away from remote villages. But the “People’s War” had never touched her sleepy village so she had little reason for fear or suspicion when three strangers approached her as she fetched the cattle home for the night.

“They told me to come over there because they had some questions,” the shy teenager said. “So I went. But when I got there they made me start walking with them away from my home. We walked and walked until we came to a place where there were about a hundred armed people in a clearing. It was then that I realised that they were Maoists.” Abducted by the guerrilla force to serve as a cook and nurse, Asha, then 13, had become one of the thousands of Nepalese youngsters caught up in Asia’s most brutal conflict, one that threatens to blight not only their childhood but the prospects of an entire generation.

Human rights organisations say that the civil war in Nepal is creating a lost generation of children, caught in the middle of an increasingly bitter power struggle between the Maoists and the security forces. “This conflict is a disaster for the children of Nepal,” Purna Sen, the Asia director of Amnesty International said in a report released last week.

Some are taken by the rebels to become revolutionaries; some are suspected of being Maoists and beaten and imprisoned by security forces; others are forced to flee their homes for fear of being caught up in the violence; others have their education cut short because of the conflict. And some, like Asha, suffer all these fates. Over the course of the past year she has been ripped away from her school and family and involuntarily conscripted into the rebel force and arrested and beaten by security forces.

When she arrived at the rebel encampment that evening, she had no idea what was in store for her. “I didn’t ask any questions because I was too afraid,” she said. “I just did what they told me.” Asha was put to work cooking for the platoon, which moved around, never stopping in one place more than a few nights. Sometimes they camped in the hills; other times in villages where they forced householders to accommodate them.

“I could never tell anyone what had happened to me because they wouldn’t let me speak to them,” she said.

Even from the fighters she tended, there were few shows of camaraderie towards her. They conversed in a dialect that she could not understand. The regular sessions of revolutionary indoctrination were conducted in the same dialect and little attempt was made to win her over.

Eleven months after her abduction, the platoon attacked an army post while Asha remained behind with a group of four others, waiting for the wounded. They never came. Instead helicopters bearing extra troops joined the battle. They fanned out across the hills to pursue the Maoists escaping from the battle scene.

As they combed the mountains, they came across Asha. The others ran away from the soldiers, but Asha was caught. The captain, who had lost many men, punched her and was pulled off by his men. Then they marched her for five days to the army barracks where she was put in jail.

Asha was taken because she was with the Maoists when she was caught, but in other areas just to be a teenager is enough to invite trouble. Hundreds of children, some as young as ten, are believed to be detained by security forces each year because they are suspected of fighting for the rebel forces. Because the Maoists so effectively entrap the young any teenager left in rebel-dominated areas is automatically viewed with distrust.

“Anyone young who can remain in Maoist areas is a prime suspect,” Suomi Sakai, Unicef’s representative in Nepal, said, “and that starts to happen as young as ten or twelve.”

In great swaths of the countryside, 75 per cent of which is dominated by the Maoists, children are disappearing, sent away by anxious parents, or fleeing to the cities or across the border to India to avoid the conflict. “If you go around the hills, there are fewer young people,” Dr Sakai said. “It’s the grandfathers and grandmothers tilling the fields. All the young men are gone.”

Asha was eventually saved last month by a chance encounter while in custody. The army had handed her over to police at the district administrative office, where she was spotted by neighbours from her home village. They informed her mother of her whereabouts and she came rushing to find her lost daughter. By then Asha had been gone for 13 months.

Mother and daughter fell on each other, crying. But freedom had to wait until the intervention of human rights lawyers who filed a petition of habeas corpus to have her released.

A month later, she is still to see her home. “I can’t go back there in case they come for me again,” she said. “I don’t know whether I will ever go home again.”

India ready to sign MLA treaty

BY SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

NEW DELHI, Aug 5 - With the Indian Cabinet clearing the signing of mutual legal assistance agreement between Nepal and India on Thursday, the stage has been set for formal inking of Extradition and Mutual Legal Assistance (MLA) Treaty, which was firmed up by the home secretaries of the two countries over six months ago.

The bilateral legal framework would boost the Nepal-India fight against terrorism and other crimes. It would facilitate cooperation in fighting crimes related to terrorism through cooperation and mutual legal assistance. On April 20, the Indian Cabinet also gave its approval for signing and ratification of the extradition treaty between the two countries.

The over 50-year-old and now-updated legal framework would come into effect once the Home Ministers of the two countries formally sign it. That would pave the way for extradition of criminals between the two countries - including Maoist leaders and workers currently jailed in Bihar, West Bengal and Tamilnadu states.

But the big question is: When will New Delhi and Kathmandu sign the new bilateral, legal framework?

Relations between the two neighbors soured after Delhi vehemently opposed the Feb 1 royal takeover. Six months later, as multiparty leaders in India continue to demand early restoration of democracy in Nepal, there is no sign of the 'special relations' normalizing to the pre-Feb 1 level.

When asked to comment, Nepal's Ambassador to India Karna Dhoj Adhikari was clueless. "I don't know when we are going to sign the treaty," he said. "But sooner relations begin to normalize on all fronts; the better it will be for both countries."

According to an official statement, the pact with Nepal on mutual legal assistance provides for effective cooperation in matters of investigation, prosecution and suppression of crimes related to terrorism, as well as offences concerning revenue and international transfer of currency, capital or payments. India has similar agreements with the US, the UK, Canada, Russia, France, the UAE and several other countries.

The two neighbors updated and firmed up the 1953 Nepal Indian Extradition and Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty during a high-level meeting, led by the home secretaries of the two countries, in New Delhi on January 20. The Treaty will be signed by the Home Ministers at an appropriate time.

Orissa Govt rapped on the knuckles over law & order

Statesman News Service
BHUBANESWAR, Aug. 5. — The government came in for severe criticism over the deteriorating law and order situation in the state, particularly the growth of tender mafia and MCC activities.

The discussion in the Assembly on a motion on law and order situation, saw the Opposition in a battle mode. The treasury benches adopted the line that the spurt in MCC and Naxalite activities was largely due to events in the bordering states of Andhra Pradesh, Chhatisgarh, Jharkhand and Bihar.

The discussions also witnessed a verbal duel between the CPI MLA, Mr Narayan Reddy and a couple of BJP MLAs blaming each other with Mr Sananda Marandi of the BJP trying to snatch the mike from Mr Reddy.

Initiating the discussion, government chief whip, Mr Kishore Mohanty set the defense in motion by referring to inter-state problems like Naxal and MCC activities. He said the situation in neighbouring states was worse than Orissa. But it was Mr Narasingha Mishra , the deputy leader of Congress, who was at his aggressive best. Ridiculing the ruling party’s claim of normality, Mr Mishra wondered, “if it were so then why was the government chief whip moving a motion on the law and order situation.” He debunked talks of transparency and insulation of police administration. “Officers have been retained in posts despite allegations and enquiry against them,” he said.
He referred to allegations that influential people were backing the tender mafia and it was growing under the patronage and protection of such elements.
Kendrapara MLA, Mr Utkal Parida noted that the spontaneous anger displayed by people in general in Kendrapara was against the district magistrate and SP. “The DM had been shifted by the Election Commission but was posted back by the government after polls,” he noted.

Countering the BJP MLA Mr Pratap Sarangi’s charge that OGP was involved in the violence at Kendrapara, Mr Parida said a sarpanch affiliated to the Bajrang Dal had been arrested in this connection by the police.

BJP MLA Mr Mahesh Sahu defended the government conceding that the violence in the aftermath of a shoot-out at Kendrapara did reflect lapses and failures of the administration.

India endorses Mutual Legal Assistance accord with Nepal

BY SURENDRA PHUYAL

NEW DELHI, Aug 5 - With the Indian Cabinet clearing the signing of mutual legal assistance agreement between Nepal and India on Thursday night, stage has been set for the formal inking of Extradition and Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty, which was firmed up by the home secretaries of the two countries over six months ago.

The bilateral legal framework would boost the Nepal-India fight against terrorism and other crimes. It would facilitate cooperation in crimes related to terrorism through cooperation and mutual legal assistance. On April 20, the Indian Cabinet also gave its approval for signing and ratification of the extradition treaty between the two countries.

The over 50-year-old and now-updated legal framework would come into effect once Home Ministers of the two countries formally sign it. That would pave the way for extradition of criminals between the two countries – including the Maoist leaders and workers currently jailed in Bihar, West Bengal and Tamilnadu states.

But the big question is this: When will New Delhi and Kathmandu sign the new bilateral, legal framework?

Relations between the two neighbors soured after Delhi vehemently opposed Feb 1 royal takeover in Kathmandu. Six months later, as multiparty leaders in India continue to demand early restoration of democracy in Nepal, there are no signs of that ‘special relations’ normalizing to pre-Feb 1 levels.

When asked to comment, Nepalese Ambassador to India, Karna Dhoj Adhikari, was clueless on Friday. “I don’t know when we are going to sign the treaty,” he said. “But sooner relations begin to normalize on all fronts; the better it will be for both countries.”

According to an official statement, the pact with Nepal on mutual legal assistance provides for effective cooperation in matters of investigation, prosecution and suppression of crimes related to terrorism, as well as offences concerning revenue and international transfer of currency, capital or payments. India has similar agreements with the US, the UK, Canada, Russia, France, the UAE and several other countries.

The two neighbors updated and firmed up the 1953 Nepal Indian Extradition and Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty during a high-level meeting, led by home secretaries of the two countries, in New Delhi on January 20. The Treaty was to be signed by the Home Ministers at an appropriate time.

In sex scandal mess, Jharkhand police prescribe family time

Ranchi: With two top policemen facing charges of rape, Jharkhand police have hit upon what they think is the remedy for "frustration" leading to sexual misdemeanour - 30 days' leave to stay with family.

Believing that the root of "immoral acts" is prolonged separation from family, Jharkhand Director General of Police (DGP) V.D. Ram has said policemen will soon be given leave to spend time with their families.

"We will soon implement 30 days' leave for cops so that they live with their family members. An order in this regard will be passed very soon," said Ram, who believed that the spurt of sex scandals in the force was an outcome of staying without family for prolonged periods.

"We feel that cops will stay away from immoral acts if they stay with their family members - they become restive when they are away for a long time".

Such provisions, according to the police, exist for central paramilitary forces.

Ram said: "We will ensure that the police take out time for their families."

The new measure is good news for the 37,000-strong police force posted mainly in Maoist-infested areas of this largely tribal state.

And they have to thank absconding Inspector General of police P.S. Natarajan and Deputy Inspector General of police Parvez Hayat, who are facing charges of sexually exploiting a tribal woman.

The scandal surfaced when a news channel flashed CD footage of Natarajan in a compromising position with the woman. Natarajan was suspended and a first information report (FIR) was lodged against him and Parvez Hayat for various charges including rape.

Now more cases of sexual exploitation by the police are coming out in the open, say officials, so much that the police headquarters is contemplating an HIV test for all personnel and seminars to generate awareness about AIDS.

Senior police officials believe a sabbatical with family would help keep the personnel from "abnormal" behaviour. The police headquarters has also decided to clamp down on other such acts of sexual misconduct.

DGP Ram said: "The Criminal Investigation Department has been directed to compile other such cases. These will be reviewed and suitable action will be taken -- the accused cops will be suspended or sacked."

Six Maoists surrender in Guntur

Friday August 5 2005 12:24 IST

GUNTUR: Six Maoist militants, including Rajitha who was involved in an attack on Chilakaluripet police station early this year, on Thursday, surrendered before superintendent of police Sajjanar.

Announcing the surrender of Maoists during a press conference here, on Thursday, the SP said that Nakka Ramana alias Rajitha of Remidicherla village in Bollapalli mandal, who had tiff with her husband approached Maoists to settle the issue.

But soon she began actively participating in militant activities, he said.

Besides participating in an attack on, Chilakuripet police station, she was also involved in killing a person in Yalamanda village and inflicting serious injuries to two persons in Adigoppula village, the SP said.

She also worked as bodyguard to, Chandravanka dalam commander, Chandana. She surrendered due to ill-health, Sajjanar said.

The other surrendered militants are: Gunda Purnachandra Rao, Kumba Anjaneyulu, Kumba Musalaiah, Yeramala Sambaiah and Kampa Venkateswarlu of Bollapalli mandal.

The SP said the six laid down their arms as they were fed up with Naxal activities and due to pressure from their family members.

OSD Harikrishna and city DSP Ravindranath Babu were present during the press conference.

I-Day nerves put NAXAL zone on toes

PRONAB MONDAL AND RANJAN LAHIRY

Policemen comb a forest for Maoists

Calcutta/Burdwan, Aug 3: Police today cautioned against Maoist attacks on Independence Day as the rebels spread their net and put “corrupt” CPM leaders in their gunsight.

Officials in the state Intelligence Branch (IB) said the state government has been alerted.

Apart from their strongholds in West Midnapore, Bankura and Purulia, the rebels might target adjoining areas on August 15, they added.

“Forest areas like Jhargram, Binpur, Belpaharai and Banspahari in West Midnapore, Bandwan in Purulia and Kanksa in Burdwan are in the danger zone. They have also prepared a roster of CPM functionaries who they think are corrupt. Most of their targets are the party’s local and zonal committee secretaries. This time, the name of a CPM MLA is on their strike list,” said an officer.

Biresh Mandal, the party’s Kanksa zonal committee secretary, said: “I know my name is on their hit list. But they will not be able to do anything. Though Maoists are spreading their organisational set-up in Burdwan, the people are with us. Informing the police about their movement is our duty.”

The police, still in the dark about the routes used by the Maoists, have for the first time decided to install hidden cameras in the forests of West Midnapore, Bankura and Purulia districts.

“We have marked some areas along the Bengal-Jharkhand border which we know are their entry and exit routes. We will set up the cameras in the trees heavily camouflaged with leaves,” said an officer.

At a meeting in Calcutta on July 31, officers from the rebel-infested districts had alerted the special branch of Calcutta police about several most-wanted Maoists staying in the city.

“The militants prefer the city for holding important meetings. Apart from this, a number of people are working in government offices who have a close link with the Maoists,” an officer had warned.

IB officials said the situation has become grimmer with a large number of CPM rebels, who were earlier attached to the party’s local committees, recently joining the Maoists. “Besides, some leaders who were part of the Naxalite movement in the 60s and 70s are now playing an active role in strengthening the organisation,” said an officer.

According to sources, a group of 60 tribals are camping in Kanksa forest. Maoist leaders are holding meetings and trying to convince poor villagers to join them. A group of youths are also being trained in physical fitness.

Thursday, August 04, 2005

Four naxalites killed in encounter

Staff Reporter

WARANGAL: Four naxalites belonging to the Janashakti group were killed in an exchange of fire with the police at Addagutta forest in Venkatapur mandal here on Thursday morning.

On a tip-off provided by the Ramakrishnapur villagers that a group of naxalites were camping in the forest, special party policemen launched combing operations. Around 7.45 a.m. the police party spotted a large number of naxalites near Addagutta. In the exchange of fire that ensued, four naxals were killed. The police recovered seven weapons-- one tapancha, one service revolver, one SBBL and four 8 mm rifles-- and eight kitbags from the spot.

The victims belonged to Madhu dalam of Janashakti group. According to informration reaching here, Janashakti District Committee secretary Gurrala Hamsa Reddy alias Naganna and several important cadre of Praja Prathighatana, including 25 other naxalites, escaped from the spot. It was in this forest that Maoist party District Committee secretary (DCS) DVK Swamy alias Yaddanna was killed, near Andugulameedhi thanda.

Attack planned

Speaking to newsmen, the Superintendent of Police, M.S. Ravindra, said they had credible information that naxalites belonging to different groups were camping in the area.

The documents secured from the encounter site indicated that they were planning to attack police stations at Venkatapur and Mulug mandal headquarters. The SP said following the martyrs' memorial week, naxal groups were trying to indulge in violence, including elimination of top political leaders

Despite joint operations, no drop in number of Naxalites

EXPRESS NEWS SERVICE

new delhi, august 4 Despite joint operations which are being supervised by two high-powered task forces, the Naxalite-affected states have not been able to bring down the number of hardcore activists.

According to rough estimates of the Union Home Ministry — which is playing lead role in the new strategy — the number of hardcore Naxalites continues to be around 9,000. At least 6,000 of them are armed. The officials have found that while incidents of Naxal violence have gone up in Andhra, most states have seen a dip.

The officials say Naxalites are now concentrating around North Bihar and East Champaran but deny that this is due to the area’s nearness to the Indo-Nepal border. “North Bihar is a neglected area and it appears they find it easy to operate there,’’ an officials said.

In the last few months, Naxalites have carried out two daring attacks in this region.

Meanwhile, anti-Naxalite protest by tendu cultivators and villagers in Bastar and adjoining areas and a sharp drop in the number of Jan Adalats conducted by the Naxalites has given the ministry much heart. It has now advised states to carry out awareness campaigns against Naxalites.

The officials clarified that despite a unified strategy, states have the power to talk to the Naxalites.



URL:

Left tries patriotism

- By Amulya Ganguli


A strange thing happened while everyone was distracted by the RSS-BJP mahayudh. The Left turned patriotic — or, at least, eagerly sought the last refuge of scoundrels. The provocation for it to try this unfamiliar line was the Prime Minister’s US visit. Even before Manmohan Singh left Indian shores, the Left started firing the warning shots. While the CPI(M)’s new Stalinist general secretary Prakash Karat cautioned the Prime Minister against surrendering to his hosts in Washington on matters of India’s foreign policy, another hardliner from the Marxist stable, the CITU’s M.K. Pandhe saw the earlier defence deal negotiated by Pranab Mukherjee with the US as an assault on India’s sovereignty.

Their unsolicited advice was impolite and harsh enough to persuade even the amiable Prime Minister to describe it as "an insult to the Congress," adding that "no Prime Minister of the Congress party can think of selling India cheap." Nor will the Prime Minister of any other party, one can venture to add. But what of the Communists? For all their current show of patriotism, these are the people who saw nothing wrong in running to Moscow and Beijing to seek advice on how to conduct their "revolution." Throughout their history as members of either the CPI or the CPI(M) or the many CPI(M-L)s, their loyalty to the country has been in doubt because of their obvious extra-territorial links. The very names of their parties let out the secret.

Theirs are the Communist parties of India, not Indian Communist parties. The reason is that the Communists believe in proletarian internationalism which means that the workers have no countries. They are supposed to unite in their fight against the bourgeoisie, which too have no countries. It’s the globalisation of the Left. Each Communist party, therefore, is only a unit in a particular country of an international revolutionary movement. Their primary loyalty is to the movement, and not to the country.

The undivided CPI saw nothing wrong, therefore, to send its top leaders — Ajoy Ghosh, S.A. Dange, Rajeswara Rao and M. Basavapunniah — disguised as manual labourers (they belonged to the proletariat, of course!) in the late Forties on a Soviet ship travelling from Calcutta to the land of their dreams. Once there, they met their lords and masters, including Suslov, Malenkov and Molotov. As Mohit Sen recounts in his autobiography, A Traveller and the Road: The Journey of an Indian Communist, "It was on the third day that it was announced that Comrade Stalin would attend. So he did for the subsequent days.

Dange and Rajeswara Rao said that he was an attentive listener though he rarely sat at the table but kept pacing up and down smoking a pipe. But he intervened subtly to turn the discussion beyond dogmatic disputes to assessments of the existing situation and immediate tactical tasks. Stalin’s view was that India was not an independent country but ruled indirectly by British colonialists. He also agreed that the Communists would eventually advance only by heading an armed revolution." These were not the only Communists who had travelled abroad in search of guidance. As Sumanta Banerjee says in his book, In the Wake of Naxalbari, several Naxalite leaders went to the land of their dreams, China, more than once to ascertain from their masters whether they were on the right ideological path. Ajoy Ghosh and others had also gone to Moscow to resolve the difference between Ghosh’s "Indian" path of revolution and Rajeswara Rao’s "Chinese" path. Rao lost because, according to Sen, Stalin "advised that the armed struggle being conducted in … Telengana … should be ended." The Naxalties, too, were similarly ticked off on their tactical blunders. Banerjee writes that Zhou Enlai and Kang Sheng told the Naxalites that their slogan, China’s chairman is our chairman, was wrong because "to regard the leader of one country as the leader of another party is against the sentiment of the nation; it is difficult for the working class to accept it." The Naxalites were also told that their policy of killing policemen was "anarchist."

The reason why these servile contacts were made in secret by the Indian Communists was not only because they functioned from the underground. After all, when the "Left" Communist leader Harekrishna Konar went to China in connection with the impending split in the undivided CPI in the mid-Sixties, the party was not under a ban. The reason for their secretiveness was evidently the guilty realisation that there was something demeaning about their pathetic dependence on the "fraternal" foreign parties. If the collapse of Communism in the Soviet Union and its transformation into "market socialism" in China have achieved one thing, it is to free the Indian Communists from the apron-strings of their mentors. But though these orphans no longer have a Stalin or Zhou Enlai to run to in order to consult them about their next steps, they, along with their underground comrades, the Naxalites, are still carrying the dead weight of what they had learnt at their mentors’ feet.

If the parallel that is drawn by them on the similarity of the economic policies of the Congress and the BJP because both these parties represent the bourgeoisie is taken as evidence, it shows that what Stalin told them about the inevitability of an armed revolution is still regarded as gospel truth by the Indian Communists. Their wariness about the parliamentary system is also reflected in a 1971 CPI resolution which said that because of electioneering, the task of "mobilising and organising the masses for mass action on an ever wider scale and higher level and building and strengthening mass class organisations and the party get relegated to the background." Preoccupation with the parliamentary system "develops an attitude which evades militant forms of mass action."

The Communists are welcome to their predilections, especially when their chances of ever achieving their cherished goals are diminishing by the day. What is odd and not a little ridiculous, however, is a lecture on patriotism from them. Anyone familiar with their history will laugh at such pretensions. Given the number of times they have had to backtrack in such matters, such as calling Gandhi a counter-revolutionary and an agent of the British — a view which, Sen writes, was "even more crudely expressed" in the Soviet Encyclopaedia till 1956 — and Subhas Chandra Bose a quisling, they cannot be unaware of the possibility of being ridiculed if they don the nationalist mantle.

If the Communists are nevertheless trying on the new, non-crimson garment, the reason is perhaps the suspicion that their supposedly main appeal of being champions of the poor is no longer very effective as their long stints in the corridors of power in some states have robbed them of their earlier sheen. As their image of being incorruptible ideologists has suffered an erosion, their dogma itself is now regarded even by some of its one-time admirers like Eric Hobsbawm as seriously flawed. Hence perhaps their new concern for the preservation of India’s sovereignty.

Four naxals killed in encounter in AP

Warangal, Andhra Pradesh, Aug 4 (UNI) Four naxalites belonging to the CPI-ML (Janasakti) were killed in an encounter in the Venkatapuram forest area of this district this morning, police said.

Police combing the forest came across a naxalite 'dalam', Superintendent of Police Stephen Ravindra said. In the ensuing exchange of fire, the four naxals were killed, he said.

The naxals have yet to be identified, he added.

Naganna, the district secretary of the Janasakti is believed to be among the dead

I-Day nerves put Naxal zone on toes

PRONAB MONDAL AND RANJAN LAHIRY
Policemen comb forests for Maoists

Calcutta/Burdwan, Aug. 3: Police today cautioned against Maoist attacks on Independence Day as the rebels spread their net and put “corrupt” CPM leaders in their gunsight.

Officials in the state Intelligence Branch (IB) said the state government has been alerted.

Apart from their strongholds in West Midnapore, Bankura and Purulia, the rebels might target adjoining areas on August 15, they added.

“Forest areas like Jhargram, Binpur, Belpaharai and Banspahari in West Midnapore, Bandwan in Purulia and Kanksa in Burdwan are in the danger zone. They have also prepared a roster of CPM functionaries who they think are corrupt. Most of their targets are the party’s local and zonal committee secretaries. This time, the name of a CPM MLA on their strike list,” said an officer.

Biresh Mandal, the party’s Kanksa zonal committee secretary, said: “I know my name is on their hit list. But they will not be able to do anything. Though Maoists are spreading their organisational set-up in Burdwan, the people are with us. Informing police about their movement is our duty.”

The police, still in the dark about the routes used by the Maoists, have for the first time decided to install hidden cameras in the forests of West Midnapore, Bankura and Purulia districts.

“We have marked some areas along the Bengal-Jharkhand border which we know are their entry and exit routes. We will set up the cameras in the trees heavily camouflaged with leaves,” said an officer.

At a meeting in Calcutta on July 31, officers from the rebel-infested districts had alerted the special branch of Calcutta police about several most-wanted Maoists staying in the city.

“The militants prefer the city for holding important meetings. Apart from this, a number of people are working in government offices who have a close link with the Maoists,” an officer had warned.

IB officials said the situation has become grimmer with a large number of CPM rebels, who were earlier attached to the party’s local committees, recently joining the Maoists. “Besides, some leaders who were part of the Naxalite movement in the 60s and 70s are now playing an active role in strengthening the organisation,” said an officer.

According to sources, a group of 60 tribals are camping in Kanksa forest. Maoist leaders are holding meetings and trying to convince poor villagers to join the organisation. A group of youths are also being trained in physical fitness.

Economic package for Maoist areas in Chhattisgarh

:-
Raipur | August 04, 2005 4:31:39 PM IST



The central government will provide an economic package for Chhattisgarh's Maoist hit areas, including arms to village defence committees, state Home Minister Ramvichar Netam said Thursday.

"A delegation led by Chief Minister Raman Singh met union Home Minister Shivraj Patil Wednesday in New Delhi and sought a package for the state's Maoist infested areas where local tribes are waging an armed battle against guerrillas," Netam told IANS over the phone.

Netam said Patil assured the chief minister that an economic package like the one for Jammu and Kashmir would be provided soon.

"The process will begin this month in the worst-hit Dantewada district bordering Andhra Pradesh," he said.

According to Netam, the state government would set up village defence committees in all the eight Maoist-hit districts.

The centre would also arrange for helicopters to enable troopers in Bastar and Surguja regions to keep an "aerial watch on the guerrilla network".

According to official records, 150 people, including 93 civilians have been killed in Naxal violence in the state between Jan 1, 2004 and June 24, 2005. (IANS)

Wednesday, August 03, 2005

REVISION OF SCHEME FOR NAXALITE AFFECTED STATES

15:19 IST
Rajya Sabha

The Security Related Expenditure (SRE) scheme for naxalite affected States has been comprehensively revised in February, 2005. This is because a large portion of the funds allocated under the scheme remained unutilized mainly due to the rate of reimbursement being 50% and its specified scope with regard to number of eligible items.

The scheme now envisages reimbursement of 100% subject to prescribed maximum items for certain items for the expenditure incurred on ex-gratia grant paid to families of the victims of naxalite violence, special training given to State Police personnel, insurance for State Police personnel involved in anti-naxalite operations, a lumpsum grant to Village Defence Committees (VDCs)/Nagrik suraksha samitis (NSSs), rehabilitation of naxalite surrenderee, publicity material, hiring of vehicles, weapons or communication equipment not covered under the Police Modernisation (PM) Scheme, logistic and camp facilities to the CPMFs (75%), etc.

To enable the States to make full utilization of funds under the scheme, the Government has also decided to make advance payments under the scheme.

This information was given by Minister of State for Home Affairs, Shri Sriprakash Jaiswal in a written reply to a question in the Rajya Sabha today.

OK/AD/SK

Tuesday, August 02, 2005

Memorial missile at Maoists

G.S. RADHAKRISHNA

Hyderabad, July 31: Andhra Pradesh police are paying back Maoists in their own coin, or rather memorial. That too, right at the rebels’ doorstep.

A massive memorial, paying homage to civilians and police personnel who have died fighting the extremists, was inaugurated yesterday in the Birpur mandal of Karimnagar district.

The pyramid structure resembles the numerous memorials to Maoist “martyrs” that dot Telengana district in coastal Andhra.

The police’s memorial, named Shanti Stupam, is located in front of the home of Ganapati alias M. Lakshman Rao, the secretary of the CPI (Maoists), at his native village Sarangpur, about 5 km from Birpur town.

With hopes of truce ebbing, the state police have launched a campaign to spread awareness on the dangers of abetting extremism. The stupam is part of this drive.

“We want to educate the civilians against sheltering and providing food to Maoists and their responsibilities in helping the police. If not, they will meet the same fate as those killed by the Maoists in cold blood,” cautioned D.S. Chauhan, the Karimnagar superintendent of police.

Rajanna, a resident of Birpur, said extremists here have killed over 18 people in the past few years for helping the police and refusing to abide by their diktat. “No one, neither Maoists nor the police, has the right to take law in their hands,” he said.

Birpur’s circle inspector Narasiah said the Maoists have built four memorials in the mandal. “If Maoists can build memorials for their comrades who waged an illegal war against an elected government, why can’t we build one for the policemen and civilians who died while protecting democracy?”

The state police have taken their battle into the interiors of the forests peopled by the rebels. Since January, a combing operation is on in the Nallamala forests and the Dandakarnya belt. The police have found a large quantity of arms, ammunition, cash and documents in Maoist dumps across the state.

The police-Maoist peace process, aborted since January when the rebels walked out of talks, shows no sign of revival. All the committees comprising civil rights activists and journalists have become defunct and the chief coordinator and moderator for the talks, S.R. Sankaran, appears to have no clue to what is going on.

Civil rights activists say a political solution is not possible. “I wish both the police and the Maoists would sit for talks to resolve the issues rather than the Maoists and the politicians,” said the president of the People’s Union for Civil Liberties’ state unit.

The rebels, meanwhile, are continuing their campaign. The Janashakti group has called a bandh tomorrow to protest against the arrest of four key activists and the recent killing of three others in encounters in Prakasham district.

Police to turn guerrillas against Maoists

Indo-Asian News Service


Ranchi, Aug 1 (IANS) Police in Jharkhand will use the same guerrilla tactics that Maoist rebels have been employing for long against them. Only they will not use landmines.

Officials said the police force is copying methods used by their counterparts in Andhra Pradesh, where specially trained police commandos known as Grey Hounds operate against the Maoists in forests.

The police have asked Jharkhand villagers, local officials and contractors to stop paying protection money to Maoists and promised to protect them if need be.

Maoists - active in 18 of the state's 22 districts - reportedly collect a huge amount of money as levy from contractors and through 'cuts' from government funds for developmental projects.

Terrorised government officials pay protection money to the rebels, police say.

Earlier policemen used to raid forests to hunt down Maoists. The new strategy is to stay camped in the forests and launch the very same guerrilla-style attacks used by the Maoists.

"Maoists carry out subversive activities and take shelter in the jungles. Now, we will target them using their own tactics," a senior police official told IANS.

The tit-for-tat method, called tailor policing, is expected to pay dividends, the police feel.

Under the system, there will be separate wings to monitor operations against Maoist guerrillas, development work undertaken by different departments and also socio-economic activities.

Jharkhand, with a large tribal population, has been hit hard by Maoist violence. Nearly 510 people, including 210 policemen, have been killed in Maoist related violence since the state's creation in November 2000.


--Indo-Asian News Service

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Zero tolerance towards Naxalite terror

by Pramod Kumar Singh

August 3, 2005, New Delhi: The Union Government has decided to adopt "Zero Tolerance" towards the various Naxal groups active across the country as long as they carry weapons. The government has further decided that any future talks with the outlawed groups will be possible only if they decide to lay down the arms.
While Naxal-affected states can initiate talks with the ultras provided they are within the legal framework, criminal activities by these groups would not be tolerated.

Having learnt a bitter lesson in Andhra Pradesh vis-à-vis the Naxal problem, the Union Government has mooted a "Unified Strategy" to deal with the Naxalite groups active in 13 states. Under this, the government has put a mechanism in place where all the states would adhere to a unified approach.

In Andhra Pradesh, the government had faltered while dealing with the problem. The peace move initiated by the government and the extended cease-fire resulted in Peoples War Group (PWG) regrouping. This time, there is a clear departure from the past as the Union Government is in no mood to talk soft with those who have been targeting innocent villagers and police force.

In a meeting of the Task Force held in the capital on Saturday and attended by the Nodal Officers of the all the affected states, the government laid out its policy to deal with the Naxal menace. Secretary, Internal Security in the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA), Anil Choudhary said on Tuesday that Maoist groups such as PWG will have to lay down their arms if they want to talk peace. To evolve a joint strategy for security initiative, there would be greater involvement of villagers in developmental activities.

The strategy also saw the need for a uniformity in the surrender and rehabilitation of the Naxals. Chief secretaries of the states have been asked to review the progress made in this regard, Mr Choudhary added.

A review of the ground situation in all the affected states including Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Orissa, Jharkhand, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, West Bengal and Uttar Pradesh felt that the situation in Andhra Pradesh was far from satisfactory.

While the situation in the other Naxal-affected states was improving, Andhra Pradesh was showing signs of more belligerence from PWG. Till June this year, 345 incidents of PWG related violence were reported in the state as compared to the 357 reported throughout 2004. However 77 armed cadres of PWG have also been neutralised.

Prior to the YS Rajshekar Reddy government embarking upon peace talks with PWG, Andhra Pradesh was the best state in dealing with the Maoist menace. Its elite Grey Hounds commandos and a well-fed intelligence network had the PWG cadres on the run. The MHA has decided to provide one Battalion of the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) and mine proof vehicles for patrolling in the PWG infested districts.

Now Chhattisgarh government tops in dealing with the Naxals and as a result, the CRPF battalion deployed in the state is being moved to Andhra Pradesh. Instead, Chhattisgarh will get a battalion of India Reserve Police. The tough measures initiated by the Raman Singh government have shown good results and Bijapur and Chandewara villagers in Bastar have been coming in droves to attend government-sponsored rallies despite being threatened by the outlaws to desist from doing so. Though 12 villagers lost their lives, the 139 village defence committees are showing positive results.

Jharkhand is another state, which appears to be on the road to recovery and none of the policemen have been killed this year, while 38 Maoists have been gunned down. The effective measures have also prevented any attack on police stations and looting of arms.

Anooppur, Shehdol and Umaria are three districts of Madhya Pradesh which are showing signs of renewed Maoist activities while Maharashtra appears to be in control.

North Bihar is one area where Maoist groups have been found to be well equipped. The area is likely to get three battalions of Sahastra Suraksha Bal (SSB) and the areas along the Indo-Nepal border are also being accorded more attention. The situation in Uttar Pradesh is under control, but in Bankura and Purulia districts of West Bengal, the Naxals have begun to attack CPI (M) cadres.

(Source : Daily Pioneer

MAOISTS abduct 300 students in Nepal

From correspondents in Kathmandu, Nepal

August 3, 2005

MAOIST rebels in Nepal had abducted more than 300 students from two far western districts in the last two days, police said today.


"A group of armed Maoists came to Binayak village in Achham district on Monday and forced 215 students to follow them to an undisclosed destination," police said.
"On Monday, they abducted over 100 students from Darling village in Baglung district."

Police said they did not know where the students had been taken while parents had appealed to the Red Cross and human rights groups to mediate with the rebels for the safe return of their loved ones.

The rebels have been known to round up students to indoctrinate them with Maoist ideology, but normally return most of them safely.

The practice has drawn criticism from local and international rights groups who have appealed to the guerrillas to protect students from violence.

The Maoists have been fighting for a communist republic in Nepal since 1996 and the uprising has claimed around 12,000 lives.

AFP

Maoist call for boycott of panchayat poll

By Indo-Asian News Service

Ranchi, Aug 2 (IANS) Maoist guerrillas in Jharkhand have called for a boycott of the panchayat polls being held later this year after a gap of 28 years.

In a press release, the Communist Party of India-Maoist (CPI-Maoist) has also threatened to take action against those who contested the elections. "The state government has nothing to do with the development of the people and the election is just a sop to fool them. The election will not help remove the miseries faced by poor people," the release stated.

Reacting on the boycott, a senior police official said there was nothing new in it. "Maoists are feeling threatened because if local bodies are constituted, they will lose the support of the rural people."

The last panchayat elections were held in 1977 in undivided Bihar.

Naxalbari Redux?

OPINION

Are the current disorders in West Bengal an extension of the NaxaliteMovement of the 1960's and 70's? Or just an import from Andhra -- in fact, amuch better and efficiently organized movement, which is rapidly extending its tentacles.

SAJI CHERIAN


Memories of the Naxalbari incident of March 1967 were revived on July 9, 2005, when three Communist Party of India - Marxist (CPI-M) leaders and a policeman were killed in two separate attacks by Naxalites of the Communist Party of India-Maoist (CPI-Maoist).

In Bankura district, two district-level leaders, Raghunath Murmu and Bablu Mudi, were shot dead by the Naxalites at Majgeria under Barikul police station. When the police reached the spot, a bomb intentionally left behind by the Maoists exploded killing a policeman and injuring 16 others. Within an hour of the Bankura incident, another CPI-M activist, Mahendra Mahato, was shot dead in the adjoining Purulia district by the Maoists.

The incident was a chilling reminder that it was West Bengal's soil that produced the first Naxalite movement. The 'Naxalites' take their name from the tiny hamlet of Naxalbari in the Darjeeling district of West Bengal where an insurrection commenced in March 1967, to spread across the state and ravage it for the better part of six years, till it was crushed in 1973, and eventually wiped out under the Emergency of 1975. Since then, West Bengal had remained largely free of the scourge of violence inspired by the radical Marxist-Leninist or Maoist ideology, even as large areas in its neighbouring states fell under the renewed spell of this ferocious dogma.

The July 9 incident, however, was not the first time that the state has woken up to Naxalite violence in the recent past. On October 14, 2004, six Eastern Frontier Rifles personnel were killed in a landmine attack triggered by Naxalites inside the Ormara forest in Medinipur district. Traditionally, the three districts of Bankura, Purulia and Medinipur have been the worst affected in Naxalite violence, especially the Jhalda, Bundwan and Jaipur areas in Purulia District; the Ranibundh, Raipur, Sarenga and Simlapal areas in Bankura District; and the Belpahari, Lalgarh, Banspahari and Khejuri areas in Medinipur District.

Reacting to the attacks on the CPI-M activists, state home secretary Prasad Ranjan Roy, on July 11, admitted there was a total 'intelligence failure' on the police's part in anticipating the attacks. Roy said that, in spite of 29 companies of paramilitary forces, including the Border Security Force (BSF) and the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), deployed in the three districts, the forces had proved ineffective in facing up to the Maoist threat.

Apart from the 'intelligence failure', a more important aspect that has allowed the Naxalites to flex their muscle is the apparent lack of development in the region, as compared to other districts of the state. According to the West Bengal Human Development Report 2004, published by the state's Development and Planning Department,

The western parts of the state (the districts of Medinipur, Bankura and Purulia or the Paschimanchal region) include some of the most backward areas from the point of view of infrastructure and material development, with the lowest levels of per capita income and also relatively poor HDI rankings..the lack of development in this region is evident not only in terms of the level of basic infrastucture in the region but also with respect to agricultural development. This is compounded by the fact that this region is relatively speaking the driest in the state; it receives the least amount of annual rainfall and is more prone to drought than other parts of West Bengal. There are large tracts of land which remain fallow because of inadequate irrigation facilities and rainwater harvesting techniques. The problems of the Paschimanchal region therefore appear at one level to be more tractable than those in the other regions, because they stem more directly from poor infrastructure and material development.


It is this poor infrastructure and underdevelopment that have been fodder to the Naxalites. Documents seized from three CPI-Maoist leaders, Prasanta Roy, Gautam Bhattacharya and Ajit Haldar, from a forest in Burdwan district on July 2, 2005, revealed details of their plans for the three districts. According to District Police chief, Niraj Singh, "We have found in the papers plans to attack or blow up police stations. There were also notebooks with details of how tribals of Bankura, Purulia and West Midnapore are 'exploited' and how they could be freed."

On July 12, echoing the findings of the Human Development Report 2004, the Minister for Tribal Affairs, Upen Kisku, stated at a public meeting at Bijaharpur, about 70 kilometres from the state capital, Kolkata, that Maoists have spread their tentacles among the tribal people as "we have not been able to provide irrigation facilities and electricity to them". This was reiterated by state CPI-M Secretary Anil Biswas, who said, "The Maoists are misguiding a section of youths in the poverty-stricken areas, cashing in on the lack of development."

Recent evidences indicate that the Naxalite spread is not just confined to the Bankura, Purulia and Medinipur Districts, but is making inroads in the Hooghly and Nadia Districts as well. In December 2004, nine Naxalites, six from Nadia and three from Hooghly, were arrested with propaganda material. In Hooghly, the police have identified the Jangipara police station area as the hub of Naxalite activities in the District, while Naxalite presence has also been reported from other areas like Goghata, Khanakul, Chanditala and Dadpur. North and South 24 Parganas are also being considered as 'targeted' districts. Barasat, Belgharia, Agarpara, Barrackore and Naihati areas in North 24 Parganas and Gosaba, Basanti areas in South 24 Parganas are said to be witnessing an increase in the support base of the Maoists. Further, Kolkata has emerged as a main operational base for the Naxalites. This was revealed by Sushil Ray and Patit Paban Halder, two senior Maoist leaders arrested from Belpahari by the Special Operations Group (SOG) on May 24, 2005. Following this disclosure, on June 1, CPI-Maoist 'politburo' member Asit Jana was arrested from the Hind Motor area of the capital city. Asit reportedly confessed during interrogation that the house where he and his associates had been staying was their main operational base in the region. According to Asit, they used small-time courier companies even to send consignments of explosives to states like Bihar, Orissa, Jharkhand and Assam.

An internal assessment by the CPI-M reportedly corroborates the fact that, in Bagmari, Jadavpur and Behala areas of Kolkata, the Maoists are actively working against the ruling party and the Government. The assessment also recorded that Maoists were making efforts to infiltrate the academic community both in Jadavpur and Calcutta University, especially the students. In the urban areas the Naxalites are adopting a different strategy, taking part in anti-CPI-M and anti-Government agitations through front organisations. Revolutionary posters and underground campaign leaflets against the CPI-M and state Government have been put up and distributed in key areas like the Writers' Building, different Government offices, Calcutta University, Jadavpur University and railway stations.

The current Maoist strategy for West Bengal appears to be a much-improved version of the Naxalbari uprising of March 1967. In an interview to The Telegraph published on July 15, a 'central committee' member of the CPI-Maoist, identified as 'Comrade Dhruba' remarked that, apart from the Bankura, Purulia and Medinipur Districts, "our mass base in Murshidabad, Malda, Burdwan and Nadia is ready. After five years, we will launch our strikes." When asked whether the Maoists had any plans for Kolkata, he said, "We do not plan violence in Kolkata because we know when we establish our base there, people will be forced to obey us."

While replying to a debate in the state Legislative Assembly on July 14, Chief Minister Buddhadev Bhattacharjee stated that, "the current version of terror culture is an import from Andhra Pradesh", adding, "neither this is an extension of the Naxalite Movement nor this has any local basis. They aren't local people. They are outsiders who are using some local youth in a game of bloodshed."

But this assessment is, at best, partial. The Andhra influence cannot be denied, and the current disorders are not an extension of the Naxalite Movement of the 1960's and 70's. There are, in fact, a much better and efficiently organized movement, which is rapidly extending its tentacles. The Naxalites definitely cross state boundaries, depending on the ground situation, and the Chief Minister's position that the present violence in the state has no 'local basis' is no more than an attempt to avoid responsibility for the incompetence of his own state machinery. Such denials ill only lead to a deepening of the existing unrest.


---------------
Saji Cherian is Research Associate, Institute for Conflict Management. Courtesy, the South Asia Intelligence Review of the South Asia Terrorism Portal

3 Maoists lay down arms

Tuesday August 2 2005 13:29 IST

VISAKHAPATNAM: Three members of the CPI (Maoist)- J Bujjibabu alias Arun, V Mallanna alias Mallesh and M Singari- surrendered before the Superintendent of Police V V Srinivasa Rao here, on Monday.

Arun, who belongs to Sampangigondi village in G K Veedhi mandal, was working as the personal security guard for Andhra-Orissa Border (AOB) Special Zonal Committee secretary Bhaskar.

Singari, a native of Pothavaram, of Koyyuru mandal, joined the revolutionary party after escaping from a forcible marriage bid by her parents.

Mallesh belongs to Ambriguda, of Pedabayalu mandal. He was a member of the CPI (Maoist) Pedabayalu Local Guerrilla Squad

Spycams to track Maoists in Bengal

Indo-Asian News Service


Kolkata, Aug 2 (IANS) Spycams would be installed at vantage points in West Bengal's forests to keep track of Maoist guerrillas who run their network from the wild, officials here said.

Under pressure to curb Maoist activity after the July 9 killing of two Communist Party of India-Marxist (CPI-M) leaders and a cop in Purulia and Bankura districts, police have started exploring all means to track extremists.

State home department sources said that apart from the forest areas of Bankura, Purulia and the Maoist citadel of Belpahari in West Midnapore districts, spycams would be installed in some areas in Kolkata and adjoining North and South 24 Parganas districts.

Local reports quoting police sources Tuesday said some spy cameras have been already fitted on an experimental basis. The footage is being monitored and cassettes changed periodically.

Police have already set up a Special Task Force and Special Operation Group to track the guerrillas, on the lines of the groups set up in Karnataka to nab sandalwood smuggler Veerappan.

Following the twin strikes of July 9, police were given mine-resistant vehicles, modern weapons and spycams to fight Maoists.


--Indo-Asian News Service

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Monday, August 01, 2005

Police trip on rebel link

OUR CORRESPONDENT

Siliguri, Aug. 1: The Siliguri police seem to have bitten off more than they could chew while arresting APDR functionary Debashis Chakraborty for his alleged links with CPI (Maoists), which has triggered a public outcry and threats of prolonged agitation.

Police today failed to produce any documentary evidence linking the 35-year-old Chakraborty with the Maoists at a news conference, which was called ostensibly to defend his arrest.

Chakraborty was arrested from his Hyderpara office on Friday night and booked under Sections 121, 121(a) and 121 (b) of the Indian Penal Code for “waging war against the state”.

“He (Debashis) has confessed that he has worked with Sandip Ahmed and Subash Chakraborty (the two Maoists who were arrested in the recent past). He basically used to work as a linkman for Maoists, and helped them get admitted to hospitals, besides getting their bookings done in hotels in Siliguri,” said additional superintendent of police Tripurari.

However, the ASP failed to back his claims with documentary evidence. Worse, he even failed to name the Maoists Chakraborty had allegedly helped. Nor could he (or he preferred not to) cite any instance when such helps were rendered by him.

“He also had links with a messenger of Anil Ghosh, who is the top MCC leader of north Bengal,” said Tripurari, furnishing cyclostyled mug-pictures of Ghosh.

“Debashis had gone to Nepal and has links with them as well as Indian Maoists,” he went on, but once again stumbled when asked to provide the details of Chakraborty’s Nepal trip.

The Association for Protection of Democratic Rights (APDR) and Siliguri Welfare Organisation (SWO) were prompt to question the police description of Chakraborty as a Maoist “linkman” when their own FIR lodged at the Matigara police station in 2004 had identified him as being a member of the central committee of the Maoist Communist Centre (MCC).

“Rajeev Mishra (district superintendent of police) and Tripurari are responsible officers and should speak with responsibility. They are now contradicting their own FIR which had identified Debashis as a member of MCC,” said Abhijit Mazumdar, working president of SWO. APDR and SWO have decided to call a strike on Thursday.

They will also hold a demonstration when Chakraborty is produced before the court on Friday.

Chakraborty, who was born and brought up in Siliguri, is known for his social work.

He is believed to have been actively involved in relief operations during the Gaisal train tragedy of 1999 and the Teesta bus mishap in 2001 in which 50 people died

Sex-on-tape: Suspended IG sees Naxal ploy

Tuesday August 2 2005 00:00 IST

RANCHI: Step into the bungalow guarded by armed cops of the Jharkhand police, and face to face is 50-plus IG P.S. Natrajan in his residential chamber at Doranda.

Suspended by Chief Minister Arjun Munda last night after he was allegedly caught on tape in a “compromising position” with a tribal woman, the IG on Monday explained it away as a conspiracy against him by Naxalites.

Natrajan, an IPS officer of the 1975 batch, South Chhotanagpur Division headquarted at Ranchi, is accused of seeking sexual favours from the woman. He was, she alleged, looking into another case of her sexual abuse by a former DIG of the CID.

“The in-house inquiry will piece together facts and submit its report to the government,” DGP B.D. Ram told this website’s newspaper.

“In this age of information technology, everything is possible. The images shown by the TV channels are not mine,” said Natarajan. “It has been dubbed. She is a woman with a Naxal link, and there is a possibility that the Naxals have ganged up to frame me...She is mentally instable.”

But Sushma Badaik, mother of a four-year-old son, claimed that she had approached Star TV reporter Surendra Soren after Natrajan sought sexual favours from her. “I did this to expose him,” said Baidik.

“Natarajan saheb was investigating into my complaint of sexual abuse by former CID DIG Parvez Hayat saheb.” Soren, in turn, said Baidik approached her in office, seeking help to expose Natarajan.

The police inquiry in place now might look into Baidik's “chequered background”. The daughter of a Class III employee of the state government, she married her boyfriend Rajesh Kujur, who was not of her caste in 2000, against her parents' wishes. The two rented a house in Palamau and had a son a year later.

Baidik, however, alleges that he ditched her soon and she returned to her parents' house with her son. Kujur, who apparently had a Naxalite connection, decided to rejoin the outfit. “This had jolted me and I loitered around for justice. But I never got it,” said Baidik.

The Palamau police registered an FIR on June 7, 2002, alleging that Badaik was gangraped by six youths. “Two of the four accused were taken into custody. But nothing happened to them,” she said. She then reportedly took up arms and was arrested in 2002 for carrying arms illegally.

She met Parvez Hayat when she came out on bail. “I had met him to seek justice and help me get back my son. Hayat saheb always sounded friendly. He also promised to get me a job of a constable and for that, he compelled me to have sex with him several times. When I did not get justice, I lodged a complaint with the CM,” Baidik said.

Natarajan was asked to inquire into the allegations last year. Hayat too had then said Baidik was mentally instable. In his inquiry, Natarajan had given Hayat a clean chit, saying “there is no substantial evidence to prove her charge”.

Intelligence fears over Maoist attacks before Independence Day

Statesman News Service

BURDWAN, August 1. — Intelligence officials fear major Maoist attacks before Independence Day in the Jungle Mahal areas of Kanksa in Burdwan. The district police have arrested several suspects on charges of carrying out Maoist activities in the district. Several Naxalite leaflets and handouts were seized during raids.
The Burdwan police have launched a drive against Naxalites at a time when its industrial belt, comprising the Asansol and Durgapur sub-divisions, is reeling under an acute shortage of policemen. The Maoists recently struck in Bankura and Purulia districts, claiming four CPI-M leaders and a policeman. The matter since then has been dealt with on a priority basis.
During the past one and a half months the police conducted raids in the Jungle Mahal stretches in the Kanksa PS area. A Maoist, Mr Prasanta Roy, and his aide Mr Ajit Halder were arrested while campaigning in favour of the Naxalite movement. Later, the police resorted to further action by posting plainclothes securitymen in the villages adjoining the jungles. In mid-July, after the Barikul and Bandwan blood baths in Purulia and Bankura, the police came to know that four armed men had detained two villagers roaming in the jungles and interrogated suspects about the whereabouts of two veteran CPI-M leaders of the party’s Kanksa zonal committee. The Burdwan SP, Mr Piyush Pandey, said, ‘‘our officials working in that area have received such an information though it is yet to be substantiated’’.
Besides conducting surveillance in the jungle areas, the police are also seeking details from banks and other financial institutions about furnished statements against bulk cash transactions. The police suspect that the Maoists camped across the agro-industrial belt have been using a number of NGOs to pump in funds to help their activities. Several banks have been issued notices by the Centre in this regard, Intelligence sources said. The police suspect the coal mafia operating in the Asansol-Durgapur region as potential fund-raisers for Naxalites.
The SP, Burdwan said: ‘‘We don’t rule out the chances that the cash generated from illegal coal trafficking are being poured into extremist activities.’’ The SP said, ‘‘we are keeping a sharp vigil on the area and have put the concerned police stations on high alert.’’

Rope trick: LATEST WEAPON in the Naxal arsenal



Rope trick: latest weapon in the naxal arsenal

Staff Reporter

Maoists planned to ignite petrol bunks using coconut ropes


LETHAL HAUL: The Superintendent of Police M.M. Bhagwat inspecting the claymore mines and other explosives recovered from two Kanagal dalam naxalites who were arrested by the Devarakonda police on Saturday.


NALGONDA: In the face of severe repression, Maoists are said to have decided to adopt cruder terror tactics to challenge the State machinery. A long rope, made of coconut fibre, found in a dump planted by the Kanagal dalam led by the notorious naxal Boda Sailu alias Kurmaiah, has provided a basis for the police to believe this.

A special party police team nabbed two members of an action team of the Kanagal dalam --Kambhampati Mallaiah alias Chakali Mallaiah alias Swamy alias Ramu and Kongala Siddiah alias Ramesh -- in Devarakonda police station limits and recovered dumps at three places on the basis of the information they gave during interrogation. The police team was stunned to find a rope in one of the dumps and the higher-ups were shocked to know the purpose of the rope.

Nationwide sensation


"For the first time in the history, naxals have decided to create a nationwide sensation by blasting petrol bunks with the help of a rope," the Superintendent of Police, M.M. Bhagwat said. "Since they wanted to create a sensation, they were all set to adopt the crudest way during the martyrs' memorial week that started on July 28," he maintained.

To a question on the purpose of the rope, one of the arrested naxals, Ramesh, said: "We planned to soak the rope in petrol first and connect it to the petrol-filling pump. If we light fire at one end, it will engulf the bunk within no time." Even as the naxal, who lights the fire, moves to a safer place, the rope would blast off the petrol tank, the SP maintained.

Though it is not clear whether the Kanagal dalam wanted to try it on its own or it was the brainwave of the high command, the police were shocked to know about the new method. "Like terrorist organisations, Maoists also adopting innovative techniques to create terror among the public. We will take necessary steps to rein in them," Mr. Bhagwat said.

Maoists blast Paswan's brother's guest house

Monday, 01 August , 2005, 16:40

Khagaria: Heavily armed Maoists blasted a guest house and a brick kiln of Pashupat Kumar Paras, a former MLA and younger brother of Union minister Ram Vilas Paswan, in Bihar's Khagaria district late on Sunday night, district magistrate Narainmurthy said.

Narainmurthy told PTI that around 60 extremists of CPI(Maoist) blew up the guest house, which was empty, with explosives. A large portion of the building collapsed as a result of the blast and there were innumerable cracks all over the structure that was still standing.

The naxals also blasted the brick kiln owned by Paras and set fire to three tractors parked there after scaring away the labourers, he said.

Some CPI(Maoist) pamphlets claiming responsibility for the blasts were recovered from the spot. Raids are continuing to apprehend the culprits, he said.

Naxalite bid to attack Gunupur (Orissa) Police Station foiled

Monday August 1 2005 12:53 IST

RAYAGADA: Timely action by the police foiled a major Naxalite attack on Gunupur police station on Saturday night. According to police sources, over 30 armed Naxalites entered Gunupur and opened fire at the police station.

The armed police force posted at the station retaliated, leading to a fierce gun-battle which lasted for an hour. Later, the ultras fled from the scene.

Sources said the Naxalites, observing Martyrs” Week, had planned to attack the police station to loot arms and ammunition. This is the second time that the ultras attacked the police station in Rayagada district.

Earlier in April, they blew up a police post in Seskhal. Senior police officials rushed to the spot and sounded a red alert in peripheral areas.

Sunabeda DIG P K Kapur, who reviewed the situation, described it as normal

NAXALS celebrated the first anniversary of merger in Jharkhand

Chakradharpur: Armed rebels celebrated the first anniversary of merger of the People’s War Group and Maoist Communist Centre at Sonua block of Porahat forest territorial division (West Singhbhum) on Sunday. In addition to the week-long celebration, activists of Communist Party of India (Maoist) paid tribute to the founders of the outfit. West Singhbhum superintendent of police Navin Kumar Singh said members of the Naxalite outfit have branched out into smaller units. “Annual celebrations by any one these groups is quite possible. But there has not been mass-level celebration as there is long range patrolling in rebel strongholds. Police have been stationed in three strategic places in the Asia famous sal Saranda forest.

Police personnel in Naxal affected areas to be more vigilant

Monday August 1 2005 14:37 IST

CHICKMAGALUR: Following the land bomb explosion incident at Hebri in Udupi district, police personnel working in the naxal affected areas and police stations in the nearby areas have been alerted to be more vigilant, District Superintendent of police B K Singh said.
Speaking to mediapersons, he made it clear that depending on the gravity and intensity of the situation the department higher officials would take decision whether to provide land bomb detector equipments.

Physical checking and vigilant on strangers have been intensified besides equipping the police personnel with modern ammunition, B K Singh said. However, he said that the torrential rains and sudeen change in the climate in this area have posed an obstacle to both the police and the anti-naxal squad to carry out their assignment.

In order to prevent the innocent educated unemployed youths being lured by the naxalites to join the movement, the police department has been providing necessary training for the youths to enable them to attend the military selection at Davanagere. It has yielded results with 12 youngsters being selected in the primary round.

Encouraged by this success and also by the tremendous response shown by the youngsters for the training camp organised by the police, the department has decided to impart training for eligible youngsters to attend the CRPF selection to be held in Hassan district shortly, B K Singh said.

251 tribals get ‘pattas’

Monday August 1 2005 13:13 IST

MALKANGIRI: District Collector Manish Kumar Verma said the tribals have been deprived of the benefits of various government programmes due to illiteracy. He was speaking at a function organised to distribute land patta among the tribals of Naxal-infested Kalimela block.

The pattas were given to 251 persons of seven panchayats in the block.

Verma said more pattas would be given to the deserving persons after the completion of a survey. A free health camp was also organised on the occasion by Zilla Swasthya Samiti.

Additional District Medical Officer J S N Acharya said steps were being taken by the State Government for prevention of diarrhoea, TB and other diseases.

Among others, Additional District Magistrate Chaturbhuja Mallick, Motu Tehsildar Maheswar Naik and Kalimela BDO Narendra Kumar Das spoke at the function, which was attended by hundreds of tribals.

Naxalite alert in Seven Orissa districts

OUR CORRESPONDENT

Bhubaneswar, July 31: Seven Orissa districts have been put on alert for fear of attacks by Maoists who are observing “martyr week” to commemorate the death anniversary of Charu Majumdar, the founder of the Naxalite movement that had its roots in agrarian unrest in West Bengal in the late sixties.

Security has been beefed up in Gajapati, Malkangiri, Raigada, Nabrangpur, Koraput in the south and Sambalpur and Sundargarh districts in the west. Martyr week began on Thursday.
Every year during the week, the Maoists pay tribute to their comrades who laid down their lives for the cause of Naxalism and also take stock of their support base in inaccessible pockets of Malkangiri.

Significantly, the number of Naxal supporters and cadres is rising in Malkangiri, Rayagada and Koraput districts, forcing the police to step up efforts to fight the menace.

Police records indicate that when a handful of Naxals supported by their counterparts of West Godavari district of Andhra Pradesh and Bastar district of Chattisgarh started a new group, Kalimela Dalam, in early 1990’s, none could imagine that the ultras would swell to the present stage in the tribal hinterland.

There are seven leading Maoist groups and three frontal organisations having 300 hardcore Naxalities and 2000 active supporters. Remarkably, Kalimela, Motu, Populur and Korkundaand Sangagampary in Malkangiriare challenging the district administrations with their ideologies.

Sunday, July 31, 2005

Sandeep NAXAL Pandey's never ending BEGGING cum APPEASING sessions

COMMENT

Are all the persons concerned here aware that
Pakistani infiltrators into India have been disturbing
peace in India?.Please note that Pranab Mukherji,
India's Defence Minister has said that Pakistan is
engaged in a proxy war with India.
Please ask the people in Kashmir whether they are
living in the atmosphere of peace.
Today there is the news that journalists were killed
in Kashmir.Every day there is some violence in
Kashmir.
Visa free entry of Pakistanis into India is bound to
promote more violence in India with Pakistan bent on
continuing its training camps for terrorists in the
POK.
Those interested in peace in the world, must first
request all countries in the world to adopt secularism
as the state policy with equality to people of all
religions, as preached by Jinnah in the Pakistan
Constituent Assembly on 11 August 1947.

Those who want visa free travel, should first try to
keep their houses without any locks.

Charity begins at home.
One should behave as he preaches.

=================================


--- asha wrote:

> Dear friends,
> i am attaching the revised budget. there was some
> coorrection needed in the last one. We still need
> close to Rs. 2,70,000 to cover our expenses.
>
> thanks
>
> --- asha wrote:
>
> > dear friends, things have started moving for
> > organization of peace events planned from 6th to
> > 14th august, 2005 (see details below). today the
> > state ministers for home and external affairs in
> > delhi have assured us that they'll let the
> pakistani
> > participants come for the convention. meanwhile,
> two
> > pakistani parliamentarians from sindh are also
> > interested in coming.
> >
> > the first commitment for contribution came
> yesterday
> > from prof. mohan bhagat and priya, volunteers of
> > AID, and Actionaid-India has agreed to sponsor the
> > staying expenses of outstation participants.
> > however, we still need over Rs. 2 lakhs to cover
> the
> > remaining expenses. we may need some extra funds
> to
> > cover travel of some participants who cannot come
> > otherwise. please send in your donations in the
> name
> > of 'Popular Education and Action Centre (PEACE)'
> > payable at New Delhi to the following address:
> >
> > PEACE, F-93 Katwaria Sarai, New Delhi-110016,
> > Telephone: 011-26858940, 26968121, Mobile:
> > 9811119347 (Anil Chaudhary), e-mail:
> > peaceact@vsnl.com
> >
> > thanks,
> > sandeep
> > ---------------
> > INVITATION
> >
> >
> >
> > VISA FREE AND PEACEFUL SOUTH ASIA CONVENTION
> >
> > & OTHER EVENTS
> >
> > 6TH - 14TH AUGUST 2005
> >
> >
> >
> > During the recently concluded India
> Pakistan
> > Peace March from Delhi to Multan when we got a
> > chance to interact with a number of common people
> of
> > both sides of the border in meetings as well as on
> > road, we were overwhelmed by the popular yearning
> of
> > citizens of both countries for a more transparent
> > border between the two countries. 58 years of
> > official enmity has not been able to weaken the
> > emotional bonding between people of India and
> > Pakistan, as has been witnessed in recent times
> even
> > during the cricket matches hosted by both the
> > countries, when common people went out of their
> way
> > to host their estranged brethrens & came back with
> > experiences which helped in healing painful
> memories
> > & washed away years of built-up prejudices.
> >
> >
> >
> > That both the governments are keen on sustaining
> > talks and less reluctant about taking bold
> > initiatives is apparent by their determination to
> > commence and continue the Srinagar -Muzaffarabad
> bus
> > service. This is the opportune moment then to
> > galvanise the peace process by debating &
> discussing
> > the possibility of a “Visa Free Borders” in the
> > nearest future. We believe that the idea of the
> > “borderless” domain as suggested by Prime Minister
> > Manmohan Singh himself in the context of Kashmir,
> > should be extended to the whole of South Asia,
> > making borders and its whole paraphernalia
> > redundant. Steps towards this will not only be an
> > acknowledgement of people’s aspirations but will
> > make South Asia a powerful progressive
> > socio-cultural, political and economic zone which
> > can dictate globalisation on its own terms.
> >
> >
> >
> > We would like this convention to be a space
> amongst
> > policy makers and policy drivers, legislators,
> > academics and activists to dialogue the direction
> of
> > the ongoing peace process and the various
> > possibilities therein.
> >
> >
> >
> > On 9th August, Nagasaki Day peace activists will
> > hold a day long joint fast at Mahatma Gandhi’s
> > samadhi at Rajghat, New Delhi to press for a
> > Borderless and Peaceful South Asia.
> >
> >
> >
> > On 14th August people of India and Pakistan will
> > light candles on both sides of the Munabao
> > (Rajasthan) - Khokrapar (Sind) border.
> >
> >
> >
> > Coalition for Nulcear Disarmament and Peace,
> > Pakistan Peace Coalition, National Alliance of
> > People’s Movements, South Asia Partnership
> > (Pakistan), Akhil Bhartiya Rachnatmak Samaj,
> > Pakistan Social Forum, Association of People of
> > Asia, Pakistan Institute for Labour Education and
> > Research (PILER), Hind Pak Dosti Manch,
> > Anjuman-e-Asia-e-Awam, Insaf, Popular Education
> and
> > Action Centre (PEACE), Asha
> >
> >
> > Contact: Insaf, A-124/6, Katwaria Sarai, New
> > Delhi-110016. Tel: 91-11-26517814, 91-11-
> 55663958,
> >
> > Monica Wahi (91-9312019558), Faisal Khan
> > (91-9313106745)
> >
> > ashaashram@yahoo.com, monicawahi@rediffmail.com,
> > faisalkj2002@yahoo.co.in
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ‘VISA FREE AND PEACEFUL SOUTH ASIA’ CONVENTION
> >
> > 7th – 8th AUGUST 2005, New Delhi
> >
> >
> >
> > 7th August, 2005 - Constantia Hall, YWCA of
> Delhi,
> > Ashoka Road, New Delhi – 110001
> >
> >
> >
> > 10:00 am
> >
> > Inauguration: Nirmala Deshpande
> >
> >
> >
> > 11:15 am – 1:30 pm
> >
> > Session 1: Easing of Travel between India and
> > Pakistan
> >
> > Syed Nazim Ali Nizami (Gaddi Nashin, Nizamuddin
> > Auliya Dargah), Hannan Mollah (MP, CPM)
> >
> >
> >
> > 1:30 pm – 2:00 pm
> >
> > Lunch
> >
> >
> >
> > 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
> > Session 2: Globalisation and South Asia
> > Amarjeet Kaur, Praful Bidwai
> >
> >
> >
> > 4:15 pm – 6:00 pm
> >
> > Session 3: Communalism and State in South Asia
> >
> > Teesta Setalvad, Ram Punyani
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > 8th August, 2005 - Constantia Hall, YWCA of Delhi,
> > Ashoka Road, New Delhi – 110001
> >
> >
> >
> > 9:00 – 11:00 am
> > Session 1: Future of Democracy in Nepal
> > Anand Swaroop Verma, Sushil Pyakurel
> >
> >
> >
> > 11:15 am – 1:30 pm
> >
> > Session 2: Nuclear Disarmament in South Asia
> >
> > Sandeep Dixit (MP, Congress), Mohan Singh (MP,
> > Samajwadi Party), Achin Vanaik
> >
> >
> >
> > 1:30 pm – 2:00 pm
> >
> > Lunch
> >
> >
> >
> > 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
> >
> > Session 3: Visa Free South Asia

Two naxals arrested, arms seized in Nalgonda , M.M.Bhagwat , Good Job.. Keep it up

Staff Reporter

Two directional mines, three claymore mines recovered


NALGONDA: The Nalgonda police arrested two naxalites of the Communist Party of India (Maoist)'s Kanagal dalam -- Kambhampati Mallaiah alias Ramu (30) and Kongala Siddiah alias Ramesh (20) -- at China Adisarpally under Devarakonda police station limits on Saturday. Two powerful directional mines of 10 kgs each, three claymore mines, a tapancha and kit bags were recovered from their possession. The Superintendent of Police, M.M.Bhagwat, told reporters to night that for the first time a rope meant to use to burn petrol bunks had also been recovered from the duo. The commander of the dalam, Boda Sailu alias Kurmaiah and another naxal, Kishan, managed to escape from the scene. They chalked out a plan to burn petrol bunks, torch RTC buses and telephone exchanges and destroy brandy shopson Sagar road to mark the martyrs' week celebrations that started on July 28. Mallaiah allegedly participated in the robbery at the State Bank of India's Gudipally branch.

COMMUNITY POLICING IN EXTREMIST AFFECTED AREA: POLICE MEKOSAM-COMMUNITY POLICING EXPERIMENT IN EXTREMIST AFFECTED AREA OF A.P. STATE,INDIA

This experiment was primarily undertaken to control left wing extremism of CPI (Maoist) group under leadership of the then Superintendent of Police of Adilabad Mr. Mahesh M. Bhagwat IPS. This experiment is the recipient of 2004 Community policing finalist award & special honor in homeland security category from International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), USA & ITT Industries Limited announced in IACP’s annual conference at Los Angeles, USA from 13th to 17th November 2004

The problem:

Adilabad in North Telangana was badly-hit-by-naxalism until recently. The People's War Group of naxalites currently known as CPI (Maoist) were in control of the district and made it inaccessible, especially the remote villages to the police. The district faces extreme poverty and is one of the most backward in the country. The people in the area used to feel that the government was uninterested in their progress. This resulted in tribals becoming antagonistic towards the government. Several landmines had been detonated by the naxalites in the area since 1989 & hundreds of member of security forces & civilian lost their life while crores of rupees were extorted by Maoist at the point of gun.

READ FOR SOLUTION

COMMUNITY POLICING IN EXTREMIST AFFECTED AREA: POLICE MEKOSAM-COMMUNITY POLICING EXPERIMENT IN EXTREMIST AFFECTED AREA OF A.P. STATE,INDIA

Maoists observe 'martyr week', Orissa on alert (LEAD)

Indo-Asian News Service


Bhubaneswar, July 29 (IANS) With Maoists observing "martyr week" to commemorate the death anniversary of legendary rebel leader Charu Majumdar, seven Orissa districts have been put on alert for fear of attacks by the guerrillas.

Security has been beefed up in Gajapati, Malkangiri, Raigada, Nabrangpur, Koraput in the south and Sambalpur and Sundargarh in the west.

Maoists had killed five people in Tamparsinga, Banjaritikira and Larabira villages in Sambalpur July 7, and had shot dead three people in Burda village in the same district in May.

Martyr week began Thursday, with Majumdar having died in police custody July 28, 1972. He was the founder of the "Naxalite" movement that had its roots in agrarian unrest in West Bengal in the late 1960s.

Maoists are today active in Andhra Pradesh, Jharkhand and Bihar and enjoy some influence in West Bengal, Orissa, Uttar Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Tamil Nadu.



--Indo-Asian News Service

For clarifications/queries, please contact IANS NEWS DESK at
2616-5778/8546, 2617-3369 or mail us at
support@eians.com

No official, tribals take Naxals’ help

Sunday July 31 2005 11:02 IST

JEYPORE: The crowd was unexpected and the hustle bustle was unusual in the Naxal-prone Badigeta village under Kalimela block that day. Malkangiri Collector was distributing land records among the tribals.

In an area, where the tribals crave for the visit of even a village level worker so that they can get a chance to put forward their grievances, the Collector’s presence had almost surprised them. Volumes of complaints were virtually poured before the Collector.

With government officials, particularly ground level staff who implement development works, staying away from the sensitive blocks of the district, the Naxals find it easy to rope in the villagers to their fold by promising them a prosperous future.

‘‘It is hard to see a village level worker but one can easily approach the Naxals for help,’’ admits Guru Madkami, a villager of Sudhakunta.

Every year, about Rs 50 crore is pumped to Malkangiri, Rayagada and Koraput districts for development works. Of the total amount nearly 70 per cent is meant for the inaccessible pockets.

But shockingly, those areas continue to be most neglected. Lack of communication between government officials and tribals happen to be the main culprit of it.

The presence of Naxals acts as a dissuading factor for several ground level staff. As a result, the district level public health camps and public relation camps to be organised every month get delayed.

However, administration sources in Malkangiri, Rayagada and Koraput said steps are being taken to address problems of tribals in Naxal-prone areas. Land reforms cells have also been formed to settle land dispute cases of tribals.

‘‘We are trying to settle the land dispute cases of tribals and address their health problems on a priority basis and are hoping for a positive response,’’ said Koraput Collector Subha Sharma.

Udupi: Naxalites Gaining Ground Within a Short Period

Udupi: Naxalites Gaining Ground Within a Short Period - People on Horns of a Dilemma


Daijiworld News Network - Udupi (GA)

Udupi, Jul 30: Just about a couple of years ago, if someone had to speak about the menace caused by Naxalite movement he/she had to give the example of Andhra Pradesh. No one could even dream about Naxalites operating in Karnataka. Even the politicians were of the opinion that Naxalite movement thrived in Andhra Pradesh due to their administrative failures.

But the situation is totally different today. Things have changed a lot within last 2-3 years. Naxalites movement has not only stepped up in Karnataka, it has also taken roots. The presence of Naxalites, which came to the fore for the first time with the encounter of two suspected female Naxalites at Edu near Karkala in November 2003, needs no elaboration today. As the movement has gained ground so too the blood bath has bathed the malnad, up-country and even the coastal districts. The greenery in malnad and Western Ghat area is slowly turning red with the advent of Naxalites and their ideologies.

Attack was well planned

This was once again confirmed with the attack on police personnel at Mattavu cross near Hebri here on Thursday evening. The Naxalites tried to blast the police jeeps with the help of landmines and hand grenades. But either police were lucky or Naxalites were unlucky that nothing serious took place. But it once again proved that here onwards it will be the infamous code 'A tooth for a tooth and an eye for eye,’ which will be in practice. The same process, waging war to bring about peace.

The Thursday attack by the Naxalites was not an accident rather a well-hatched conspiracy in which they made police to come to the spot, following their trail. Udupi SP S Murugan at Hebri revealed this while speaking to the press. He said that the Naxalites used 5 landmines out of which one did not blast. The experts later defused it. He however denied the news reports that the Naxalites used hand grenades. "They did not make use of hand grenades; they rather shot at police with their guns from the right side of the road. There were 10-15 Naxalites in the group. But when the police too opened fire the Naxalites fled the place and disappeared in the dense forests," he clarified.

Udupi to get Bomb Detonator Squad - AGP Bharani

"Since the Naxalite movement is getting intensified and violent, the Udupi district will be provided with a Bomb Detonators Squad and a Self Defense Squad," said Additional General of Police (law and order) Subhash Bharani.

He was speaking to the presspersons after visiting the place at Mattavu cross where Naxalites tried to blast police personnel using landmines. He further said that the police force is all prepared to face the Naxalites at any time. The special squad which has been deployed a couple of months ago will be given proper training and provided with all facilities to stand up against the Naxalite challenge. He denied reports that Naxalites used RDX during Thursday's attack.

"Special programmes will be undertaken to improve the relationship between the residents and the police. The villagers will be taken into confidence before taking any move. Naxalites are not here to help out the villagers. If anyone holds on to the belief that Naxalites are there for people's welfare, then he/she must review his views after Thursday's attack,” said Bharani.

Western Range IGP Suresh Babu and Udupi SP Murugan accompanied him as he visited Kabbinale and other areas on Friday July 29.

Police have not Lost Morale - IGP Suresh Babu

"The police have not lost their morale by Thursday's Naxal attack rather the attack has strengthened their commitment towards the cause of nipping the Naxalite movement from the state," said Western Range IGP Suresh Babu.

He was speaking to the reporters at the Inspection Bungalow at Karkala on Friday July 30 afternoon. He has been present at Kabbinale from Thursday night itself. He said that Naxalites seemed to be avenging the death of their comrades. "But police will not take revenge. We never take revenge. We only maintain law and give a proper answer to the ones who try to disrupt peace. We have not underrated the strength of the Naxalites. We are ready for any challenge in the future. With this incident we will be a little more vigilant and proactive," said he.

Assurance and promises come in plenty. But the ones who are really living under the sword are the residents who are caught up between the police and the Naxalites. It they pass on information to the police about Naxalites, the latter will trouble them and if they stand by the Naxalites, then the police are there to trouble them. Confusion is not choosing the lesser evil but the confusion is between choosing life and death. Therefore no on has the answer.