Friday, November 19, 2010

Maoists set ablaze panchayat office

Suspected Maoists set ablaze a panchayat office at Sankrail in West Bengal's Paschim Medinipur district late on Thursday.

Meanwhile, there were reports that four bodies were seen by villagers at the bottom of a dried-up well at Shirshi village in the district. The police, however, could not confirm the report. “A group of men set the panchayat office on fire.

Most of the furniture and some documents were gutted. None was injured in the incident,' Superintendent of Police of Jhargram, Pravin Kumar Tripathi said on Friday.

Mr. Tripathi said investigations pointed to the involvement of some local supporters of the Maoist-backed Police Santrash Birodhi Janasadharaner Committee, and that attempts are being made to arrest them.

Suspected Maoists blew up a Communist Party of India (Marxist) office at Bhimpur earlier in the day with a landmine.

Cops get ready to face 26/11, Naxalites

Government has bought simulators with software that will recreate environment during the 2008 attacks

Ashutosh Patil

Posted On Saturday, November 20, 2010 at 02:02:17 AM

Mumbai police on Friday got its second advanced training simulator installed at Kandivali police station to better the skills of its force. The first simulator was installed at RCF police station in Chembur in May.



This new simulator comes loaded with a software that will recreate the environment of 26/11 attacks and the ongoing fight with Maoists in the forests of Gadchiroli.

Dedicating the equipment to the team, Additional Commissioner of Nnorth Region Ramrao Pawar said, “Four policeman can be trained at a time on this simulator.”

Senior officers who experienced the machine were excited.


The government has earmarked Rs 2 crore to purchase seven such simulators for centres across the city

“We get an opportunity to practice at the shooting range once a year, but here we can practice as many times as possible.

This will definitely can improve our shooting skills,” said Suryakant Ghadge, senior inspector of Kandivali Police station.”

Jayawant Hargude, Assistant Commissioner of Police said, “With the new software, one can experience combat situations like 26/11 attacks or fight with Naxals dense forests lined with landmines.”

The government has earmarked Rs 2 crore to purchase seven such simulators for centres across the city.

The software can be upgraded whenever required and can be changed to create environments as per requirement.

Omar warns of growing Maoist-terrorist nexus

November 19, 2010
Updated 14:16 IST



Jammu and Kashmir Chief Minister Omar Abdullah on Friday warned of a growing nexus between Maoists and the militants in his state.

Speaking at the India Today State of States Awards ceremony in the national capital, Abdullah blamed Left-thinking academics and Maoist sympathisers for that. He said they were trying to stir trouble in the valley by organising seminars there.

"What for a lot of states is a theory of how to deal with it (militancy), we have been dealing with it in practical terms for 20 years now. We have seen the effect on development, the effect on governance of insurgency," the young chief minister said.

He said efforts were being made to build bridges between Naxals and militants in the state. In this context, it was disturbing to see Maoist sympathisers moving to Srinagar.

"While we have no experience with the Maoist insurgency, of late, we find effort being made to build bridges between the Maoists and Naxalites of rest of India with the militants of Kashmir and also some Left-thinking academicians and students in Jammu region as well," Abdullah said.

"What we have lived through is the actual effects of violence and insurgency on every aspect of governance, on our ability to generate investment, on our ability to actually govern, on our ability to conduct an election in which people are free to vote as they wish to, on our ability to provide basic services," he added.

Omar warns of growing Maoist-terrorist nexus

November 19, 2010
Updated 14:16 IST



Jammu and Kashmir Chief Minister Omar Abdullah on Friday warned of a growing nexus between Maoists and the militants in his state.

Speaking at the India Today State of States Awards ceremony in the national capital, Abdullah blamed Left-thinking academics and Maoist sympathisers for that. He said they were trying to stir trouble in the valley by organising seminars there.

"What for a lot of states is a theory of how to deal with it (militancy), we have been dealing with it in practical terms for 20 years now. We have seen the effect on development, the effect on governance of insurgency," the young chief minister said.

He said efforts were being made to build bridges between Naxals and militants in the state. In this context, it was disturbing to see Maoist sympathisers moving to Srinagar.

"While we have no experience with the Maoist insurgency, of late, we find effort being made to build bridges between the Maoists and Naxalites of rest of India with the militants of Kashmir and also some Left-thinking academicians and students in Jammu region as well," Abdullah said.

"What we have lived through is the actual effects of violence and insurgency on every aspect of governance, on our ability to generate investment, on our ability to actually govern, on our ability to conduct an election in which people are free to vote as they wish to, on our ability to provide basic services," he added.

Links between Naxals, militants visible: Omar

November 20th, 2010


Jammu and Kashmir chief minister Omar Abdullah on Friday said there were “visible and invisible links” among the militants in the state, the Maoists, Left-leaning academicians and supporters.

“We have no experience with Maoist insurgency even though of late we find efforts being made to build bridges between the Maoists and Naxalites of the rest of India with militants of Kashmir and also some Left-thinking academicians and students in Jammu region as well,” Mr Abdullah said. He maintained that not only were there visible links, but also several covert connections between the two. “We have seen evidence of it (of bridges being built between Maoists and insurgents in Kashmir). A lot more effort to build a sort of interaction. A lot of movement of known Maoist sympathisers now travelling to Srinagar and organising seminars and conferences with supporters of militant violence in Jammu and Kashmir as well,” he said while speaking at a seminar in the capital. Mr Abdullah was apparently alluding to Maoist sympathisers like writer-activist Arundhati Roy who had expressed support to Kashmiri separatists at a recent programme held here where pro-Azadi slogans were also raised.

Mr Abdullah pointed out that the state has been witnessing a new form of violence since 2008 in the form of stone-pelting “which is a more orchestrated civil protest sort of system”. He said that due to militancy and violence Jammu and Kashmir could never hope to compete with big states. Mr Abdullah maintained that insurgency had affected all aspects of governance including conduct of elections and generating investment in the state. Meanwhile, the Jammu and Kashmir government is soon expected to de-notify Srinagar under the Disturbed Areas Act, a move that would render the AFSPA ineffective in the summer capital of the Valley. Government sources here said that nearly 2,000 security personnel will be shifted out from the civilian areas to the border areas without disturbing the counter-insurgency grid in the state.

Naxals strike Jharkhand village, kill & maim at will

B Vijay Murty and Anbwesh Roy Choudhary, Hindustan Times
Email Author
Bundu, November 20, 2010First Published: 00:21 IST(20/11/2010)
Last Updated: 00:22 IST(20/11/2010)


When Pradip Munda was about to start the feast he had been promising his friends, Sanjay Mahato and Sonaram Munda, for a long time, it was well past dinner time in a rainy night. Pradip and his friends, who were quite high on the Maoists’ hit list for their anti-Maoist campaign, also felt secured


because of the presence of a company of Jharkhand Armed Police (JAP) in a school building barely 50 metres away.
But it took only four rebels to storm the hutment and kill the three and Pradip’s elder daughter. The policemen dared to come out of their camp only after one and a half hours later and making sure that the rebels had left. “They even asked the village women to shield them,” said angry women,

Next day, as the impact of the violence sank in, anger surfaced in Pradip’s Barahatu village, raising once again apprehensions of a fierce fight between the rebels and the villagers.

Agitated villagers, mostly youngsters who had pledged to resist the rebels, took out rallies with traditional weapons and forced a shutdown in the town.

A shutdown has also been called in four blocks of Ranchi district on Saturday to protest the killings. The villagers are once again regrouping to launch a campaign against the Maoists.

The scene at Pradip’s hutment on Friday morning was gory. Utensils, clothes, bed sheets and a tattered blanket were all soaked in blood and a portion of the roof was blown apart. “Since it was raining, people were inside their houses,” said Pradip’s uncle Pada Lakshman Singh Munda, who came out of his house in the neighbourhood after hearing the gunshots only to find his nephew and the three others dead.

A 14-year-old girl, witness of the incident, said: “Pradip and his friends were seated on a cot inside the house. His wife, Lakhimani, and two daughters were near the hearth when suddenly the rebels came in and sprayed bullets.”

Changing face of red zone in Bihar

Agencies Posted online: Thu Nov 18 2010, 15:46 hrs

Imamganj (Sherghati) : When Saman Kumar Daangi set up the first cyber cafe in Imamganj bazaar of this naxal-hit area nine years ago, there were no takers.
But that was then. At least three cafes within an area of half a kilometre have come in the bazaar now, nothing short of a revolution for the people in this backward constituency.

Scores of village youths, including girls, can be seen waiting outside Prime Computer Centre for their turn.

"I had opened the first computer centre in the bazaar in 2001. Then as the law and order situation improved, two more computer centres came up in 2008. Currently three of the five computer centres in the area have internet facilities. And terminals hardly remain unoccupied with village youths evincing keen interest in net-surfing," says Saman.

The cyber cafes, which have come as a boon for residents of nearby villages like Bovandi, Malhar, Dubhal and Karain, do a brisk business but power supply remains a problem.

"Electricity connection has come but power plays truant during day time. Out of 24 hours, power is for around 10 hours during night and we have to depend on generators to run our business," says Saman.

"Despite, Rajiv Gandhi Rural Electrification Project, there is no electricity in major parts of the constituency. Electric poles are there in many villages but wiring has not been done while at some places, transformers have not been installed," a local Baleshwar Prasad said.

But Prasad is hopeful that the area would see a turn around once it is connected with 153-km state highway connecting Dumaria with the state capital. The under construction road will bring down the distance between Imamganj and Patna at least by 50 kms.

The Vasudha Kendras opened by the state government which provide villagers at panchayat level facility for internent use have added to the cyber revolution.

However, out of the 17 panchayats in Imamganj, only eight have these centres.

In the newly-constituted Sherghati assembly segment, Muslim girls cycle their way to school, a rare sight till a few years ago.

"My sister Sana has got the cycle from the school. Since the bicycle has come, our parents no longer forbid us from cycling. 10 to 15 girls in our village have got bicycles," says Nazneen in Akouna village.

The school, which is almost seven kms away from Akouna, has been a sudden surge in attendance particularly after the state government provided the girls free bicycles.

"They are paddling to power," remarks a school teacher in Sherghati.

Imamganj, the hot-bed of naxal activities and caste/class wars fought between erstwhile MCC and Sunlight Sena, is also witnessing for the first time a resistance to such "forced" violence.

Maoists had swooped on a high school building in Maigra in broad daylight during Independence Day celebrations and asked villagers to hoist a black flag. An angry school girl snatched the flag from the Maoists' hand and burnt it in their presence.

As the group tried to drag the girl, students accompanied by locals attacked the extremists forcing them to flee.

"This was something that was unimaginable ten years back," says a local in this constituency represented by Bihar Assembly Speaker Uday Narayan Choudhury.

The area has not witnessed any major caste violence in at least six years with residents more keen on addressing the basic issue of livelihood.

A noted Urdu poet Harendra Giri "Shad", who has studied social strifes, says, "the caste-strife has reached a saturation point in the area and there is a realiasation in both sections that mindless violence is not going to solve their problems.

"Though the divide persists, the eruptions are not so extreme," he said.

In Sherghati bazaar, the screaming wall writings for making Sherghati a district which were visible till a few years ago are absent and it appears the decades-long movement has lost its edge. The recent incidents of some highly publicised murders appear to have had some bearing on RJD's Muslim-Yadav combination in this constituency, though its candidate and former Power Minister Shakeel Ahmed Khan is the most known face in the area.

The most talked case is of Neema village, where Aftab Khan, who had married a Yadav girl almost thirty years back, was bludgeoned to death soon after he returned the village with his wife a few months ago.

Neema falls in Gurua constituency, which was represented by Khan three times.

Khan used to hold five portfolios during the heydays of Lalu Prasad's RJD and even now he is a prominent Muslim leader in the state.

The SP, BSP, and JDS have also fielded Muslim candidates while at least four Yadav candidates are also contesting from the area.

The JD-U has fielded Vinod Yadav, who is banking on his personal rapport in the area and Nitish Kumar's development plank.

All the three blocks of the constituency Aamas, Dobhi and Sherghati are naxal affected.

In the adjacent Gurua constituency, it appears to be a direct contest between RJD's Bindi Yadav and BJP's Surendra Singh. Congress has fielded a local Anirudh Yadav. Bindi Yadav has been the Chairman of Zila Parishad.

Karma village, described as "cultural hub" of Maoists, is just a few kilometres away from here.

Auto rickshaws and mini buses ply even in the first few hours of the night on the road connecting Karma and Gurua bazaar, which was earlier considered o go areas after 4 PM. Howver, rampant unemployment and poverty prevails in villages dotting the road.

"There are no jobs. The road is there but the road should also lead to somewhere," says Ravi, an under-graduate student

UAV commando carriers for anti-terror ops on government menu

New Delhi, Nov 18 (PTI) Government is looking to procure helicopter-shaped Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to airdrop small commandos units for launching special operations to counter terrorism and naxal menace with added swiftness and stealth.

The UAVs till now were used by various security forces to gather intelligence and conduct reconaissance missions in unfriendly terrian but commandos onboard is a maiden initiative.

The Qualitative Requirements (QRs) for the rotary wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) floated by the Home Ministry specify that the air borne machine should be able to "deploy two to three men team" at a short notice.

Experts handling the technology in the Home Ministry said that such UAVs have recently been used by the NATO forces in Afghanistan and it can carry men by replacing the equivalent weight of the payload that the UAV is stipulated to bear.

Such operations, by deploying a crack commando team on-board the UAVs, can be undertaken in case of a terror attack in urban areas and even naxal zones, sources said.

The Draft QR specifically states that the "UAV should be capable of rapid deployment with a detachment not exceeding two to three men and should have all weather day and night operations capability", an essential requirement for such machines to perform in the tough and unknown terrains.

"The system (UAV) must be able to detect and acquire the designated targets. The sensor packages must provide a high quality imagery resolution to permit target detection, recognition, identification and accurate location of targets, move of personnel and vehicles.

"The UAV must be capable of being deployed and operated in built up areas and narrow lanes during counter-terrorist and counter-hijack operations," the QR said.

The new desired UAVs for the security forces including the elite NSG, will also have the capacity to record data upto 80 Gega Bytes (GB).

The security forces, according to sources, have asked for an "intelligent" UAV which can change its pre-fed programming and go into a "loiter" mode in the operations area to suit the need of the operation.

The UAV should also be capable "of providing real time high quality video with full flight telemetry and capable of tackling ground targets, both static and mobile".

The UAV is desired to cruise at a speed of 30 knots and above with hovering and hanging facilities in the air and the sensors deployed on it should pick up the target at 400 metres. It should also be airborne for about six hours, the QR floated after consultations with various security agencies said.

Sources said the desired UAV should have a platform to enable simulation exercises for troops prior to an operation and should have all facilities of maintenance and product support.

Anti-Naxal Force hit by fund shortage

Express News Service
Posted: Fri Nov 19 2010, 03:52 hrs
Kolkata:


The financial crisis has taken its toll on the government drive against Naxalites in the Left Wing Extremism-affected districts of Bankura, Purulia and West Midnapore.

The state government had sanctioned Rs 35 crore for raising the Counter Insurgency Force (CIF) to tackle Naxal menace. However, a bill for Rs 17 lakh - to buy uniforms for the jawans - has been pending for the last three months. The government has also not cleared the 30 per cent risk allowance for the CIF, which if meant for police personnel deployed to fight Naxalites.

“Both the files have been lying with the finance department,” a senior official of the Home Department told The Indian Express.

A meeting, which was chaired by Home Secretary G D Gautama, was held today to sort out the issue. While the training centre for the CIF is going to be set up at Salua, in West Midnapore district, the administrative headquarters will be set up at Garia in Kolkata.


“At present training is imparted from various schools run by police forces of other states and also the BSF and the Army,” the official said

Two Naxals arrested in Dantewada

2010-11-19 01:30:00
Last Updated: 2010-11-19 08:01:39

Raipur: Two Naxals, including a woman carrying a reward of Rs one lakh on her head, were arrested in Chhattisgarh's Dantewada district on Friday, police said.

Acting on a tip-off, police arrested Madkami Hunge alias Shanni, who was carrying a bounty of Rs one lakh, and Madkami Arjun, Sautnaur village under Tongpal station area, Dantewada SP SRP Kalluri told PTI over phone.

Shanni, a member of the Darbha division's military company, was in Arjun's house in Sautnaur since the past one month for getting treatment, he said.

She was involved in Naxal activities since 2003, while she was just 15, Kalluri said adding that she was working under Darbha division committee commander Ganesh Uikey since March 2010.

Shanni was involved in an encounter Palodi under Kistaram station area, in which three jawans were killed, another encounter in Singanmadgu in which six police officials were killed. She was also involved in an the firing on a police helicopter in 2008, the police officer said.

A 315 bore rifle and three live cartridges were found from her possession, he said.

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Pakistan and the Naxalite Movement in India

"Pakistan and the Naxalite Movement in India is republished with permission of STRATFOR."

November 18, 2010 | 0857 GMT

By Ben West

Indian Maoist militants, known as Naxalites, have been meeting with members of the outlawed Pakistani militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), according to the director-general of police for India’s Chhattisgarh state. Based on information from a police source, state police chief Vishwa Ranjan said Nov. 11 that two LeT operatives attended a Naxalite meeting in April or May. While their presence at the meeting still needs to be corroborated, the chief said, it appears very likely that the Naxalites held the meeting to adopt a new policy and plans for increasing “armed resistance” in order to seize political power in India.

Indian authorities are using the alleged meeting between LeT operatives and Naxalites as evidence that Pakistan is trying to forge relationships with the Naxalites, which India has long suspected. India blamed the LeT for the 2008 Mumbai attacks and the 2001 parliament attack. For the Indian public, LeT also has become synonymous with Pakistani intelligence operations. The group that Indian officials refer to as “LeT,” however, is no longer an ally of Pakistan and has changed so much in recent years that we have started to refer to it and similar groups as “neo-LeT”.

Before this latest accusation, Indian officials implicated at least six other militant groups in Naxalite activities (with varying degrees of Pakistani support). Linking the estimated 10,000-strong Naxalites to militant groups backed by Pakistan, India’s main geopolitical rival and primary source of external security threats, creates a “nightmare” scenario for India. Indeed, Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has labeled the Naxalites “the biggest internal security challenge” to India. Taken at face value, reports of such an alliance lead to visions of well-trained, well-disciplined Naxal militants expanding their near-daily attacks on low-level rural targets in eastern India (known as the “Red Corridor”) to political and high-tech targets in Calcutta, Hyderabad or even New Delhi. But such visions are alarmist and do not reflect the true nature of the very limited Pakistani-Naxalite relationship.

STRATFOR has watched Indian officials link Pakistan to the Naxalites before, but we have yet to see significant changes on the ground that would give any credence to the scenario outlined above. Many Indian officials are equally insistent that no connections exist between Naxalites and Pakistan. Although the Naxalites have provided rhetorical support for Kashmiri (and other anti-Indian groups’) opposition to New Delhi over the past year, there has been little action to back up the rhetoric. The Indians have long feared that outside powers would manipulate grassroots groups in India and further destabilize an already regionalized country. When the Naxalite movement began in the 1960s, New Delhi feared Beijing was trying to get a foothold in India, and for the past 50 years India has demonized Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence directorate (ISI) for allegedly supporting militant operations in India.

To better understand the allegation that Pakistan is supporting the Naxalites, we have decided to investigate the sources of Naxalite weapons and training to get an idea of how much outside help the Naxalites rely on in the first place, since this is one way to measure the level of outside assistance. The study below focuses on what types of arms Naxalites have access to, how they got them and who they got them from. While we did find evidence of some Pakistani involvement in supplying the weapons through third parties, the Naxalites appear to remain a very self-reliant group that has not established a strong partnership with Pakistan when it comes to weapons and training.

Weapons

Local Indian media sources report that Naxalite forces have an arsenal of approximately 20,000 weapons — an average of two weapons per soldier. The Naxalites have obtained this arsenal from four different sources:

  1. From Indian security forces, either by Naxalite raids on their outposts in Naxalite-controlled areas or bribing or coercing members of the security forces to sell or give them firearms and ammunition, along with ballistic vests and tactical gear, including night-vision optics. This is the source of most Naxalite weapons, which include Indian-made assault rifles, light machine guns and carbines that fire 5.62mm NATO ammunition; variants of the AK-47 that fire 7.62mm rounds; and locally made shotguns of various gauges. Israeli-made sniper rifles have also been found in Naxalite caches on a few occasions, likely the Galil 7.62mm rifles that India acquired from Israel in efforts to target Naxalite leaders in the first place.
  2. Theft from businesses operating in the Naxalite-controlled areas, including fertilizer distributors and mining companies that maintain stocks of explosives, blasting caps and detonators.
  3. Local arms factories run directly by Naxalites or other criminal groups. These operations demonstrate a wide range of craftsmanship, from assembling makeshift weapons from discarded parts to more advanced forging processes. These factories also produce homemade mortar rounds and components for improvised explosive devices.
  4. Procuring foreign weapons, ammunition and explosives from external militant and criminal groups operating within and outside of India. Details on the types of weapons procured this way are available from seizures of weapons shipments into India that have included rifles in the .315- to .30-06-caliber range. Such shipments are traded for smuggling services or purchased with funds from banditry, extortion or revolutionary taxes. Purchasing weapons from the outside is very expensive. According to a 2009 India Daily News article, Naxalite expenditure reports seized by police showed that, over a six-month period, one zone command spent more than three-quarters of the unit’s budget on weapons ($70,214), with the rest ($20,604) spent on supplies. Such evidence suggests that Naxalite weapon procurements from the outside have their limitations; obtaining them locally is far cheaper and can be done by virtually any Naxalite fighter.

The Naxalite arsenal is vast and diverse, consisting of weapons manufactured in China, Russia, the United States, Pakistan and India. Photographs of Naxalite units in training or on patrols show fighters wielding a variety of rifles in different calibers and conditions, indicating a lack of weapons uniformity across Naxalite units. While this does suggest a certain level of resourcefulness among the Naxalites, it also means that parts and ammunition are not interchangeable, which is an important tactical limitation. If one rifle breaks, its parts cannot be easily replaced. If one militant runs out of ammunition, he cannot turn to his neighbor for more rounds. Standardized weapons are a key advantage for organized militias (the Taliban, for example, virtually all use a variant of the AK-47), an advantage the Naxalites appear to be lacking. The lack of weapons uniformity among Naxalite groups indicates that they do not have a benefactor that has bestowed on them a reliable, standardized arsenal and have had to build up their own from scratch.

Outside Suppliers

There are numerous reports in open-source media in India and elsewhere that link Naxalites to a number of militant and criminal groups throughout South Asia. These groups interact with Maoists from Nepal, secessionists in India’s restive northeast, ISI-backed Islamists from Bangladesh, criminals from Myanmar and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) in Sri Lanka. Weapons flow among these groups in a region that has historically been a rich environment for secessionist movements.

The British originally encouraged strong regional identities throughout the Indian subcontinent to prevent the various ethnic groups from uniting in opposition to British colonial rule. The Pakistanis continued that strategy in order to maintain leverage over India, supporting anti-Indian groups primarily in the contested Kashmir region and later in Bangladesh (formerly East Pakistan), which they used as bases for extending their activities into India. India also supported anti-Pakistani groups in Bangladesh in an attempt to offset this Pakistani pressure. The Naxalites have benefited from this arrangement, directly from foreign powers like Pakistan and, for the most part, through indirect relationships with other regional secessionist movements that also oppose New Delhi.

STRATFOR sources in India claim that Pakistani intelligence has established business relationships with Naxalites to sell arms and ammunition and lately has tried to use Naxal bases for anti-Indian activities. There is evidence that the ISI is providing weapons and ammunition to the Naxalites in exchange for money or services, mostly through third parties like the United Liberation Front of Asom (ULFA) or the ostensible Bangladeshi militant leader Shailen Sarkar (both are described in more detail below). Naxalite leaders in India deny cooperating with Pakistan but have very publicly pledged their support for separatist movements in India. STRATFOR sources in the Indian army say they are investigating but still lack the evidence to prove a direct link between the Naxalites and the ISI, since the Pakistanis continue to play a peripheral role.

The groups below are reported to have had contact with the Naxalites and to have provided various levels of support. Some of these groups have established links to the ISI, which makes them possible conduits of contact and support between Pakistan and the Naxalites.

  • ULFA, one of the largest, most violent secessionist movements in India’s northeast, is accused of working with ISI Islamist assets along the Indian-Bangladeshi border, where it controls smuggling routes through the Siliguri corridor. The Indian government accuses the Naxalites of working with ULFA to smuggle drugs and counterfeit money through Siliguri on behalf of the ISI in exchange for weapons and explosives.
  • The People’s Liberation Army of Manipur (PLAM) is a secessionist group in the northeastern Indian state of Manipur. According to Indian security officials, the respective political wings of the PLAM and the Naxalites signed a document in October 2010 pledging to “overthrow the … Indian reactionary and oppressive regime.” However, there are no documented instances of PLAM providing material support to the Naxalites. Indian intelligence agencies report that a militant from Manipur who was arrested in 2007 revealed that the PLAM leadership was in frequent contact with the LeT leadership in 2006 as directed by the ISI.
  • The National Social Council of Nagaland-Issac Muviah branch (NSCN-IM) is a secessionist movement in the northeast Indian state of Nagaland. Indian Home Secretary G.K. Pillai said in June that the leader of NSCN-IM helped members of the Communist Party of India-Maoist (CPI-M) smuggle weapons through Myanmar and Bangladesh. Indian officials in the state of Tripura accused the NSCN-IM of working jointly with the ISI in assisting militant cadres.
  • The People’s War Group (PWG) was a militant faction of the Communist Party of India-Marxist/Leninist until 2004, when it left and helped form the CPI-M, which is the political arm of the Naxalite movement. In 2004, the PWG received bomb-making materials and training from groups like ULFA and NSCN-IM in Bangladesh in exchange for smuggling drugs into India, an effort organized by the ISI between 2000 and 2004, when the PWG was not under the Naxalite umbrella.
  • LTTE is an ethnic secessionist movement in northern Sri Lanka that was defeated by Sri Lanka’s military in 2009 after 26 years of fighting. According to a surrendering Naxalite commander, LTTE militants taught Naxalites how to handle mines and grenades at a camp in Bastar, Chhattisgarh state. LTTE fighters have fled Sri Lanka since their 2009 defeat, and Indian authorities suspect that Tamil fighters are providing training for Naxalites in exchange for safe haven.
  • Nepalese Maoists comprise the militant wing of the Unified Communist Party of Nepal. They have exchanged training and weapons with Indian Naxalites, and there are also reports of Nepalese Maoists receiving medical care at Naxalite camps in India.
  • Shailen Sarkar is a member of the Communist Party of Bangladesh. The Indian Home Ministry accuses Sarkar’s group of training Naxalites at ISI-funded camps in Bangladesh. The ministry also claims that Sarkar has met with Naxal leaders in India.

Evidence of direct links between the ISI and the Naxalites is hard to come by. The connections above show only links between Naxalites and Pakistan via third parties, which makes it hard to measure the influence that Pakistan has over Naxalite militants. Pakistan likely wants to keep its activities in India covert so as not to exacerbate an already tense diplomatic situation. Murky, circuitous relationships are most likely preferred in this kind of environment.

Indeed, Pakistan does not necessarily need much more than murky, circuitous relationships in order to keep pressure on New Delhi. The Naxalites are a low-maintenance, self-sustaining movement that will continue to undermine Indian rule in the country’s east — Pakistan does not need to expend more resources to sustain this, and the Naxalites are likely wary of undermining their own local legitimacy by accepting too much assistance from an outside government. While something like a standardized arsenal compliments of the ISI would benefit the Naxalites operationally, such a move would be a high-risk, low-reward effort for Islamabad, which seeks to operate very subtly in India for the time being while tensions over the 2008 Mumbai attacks continue to cool off.

The lack of evidence of an institutional relationship between Naxalites and Pakistan does not mean that personal relationships between ISI assets and Naxalite cadres could not develop through the limited interaction now taking place. A combination of more aggressive people from both sides could certainly lead to a more concerted attacks in India, reminiscent of the 2008 serial bombings in cities throughout India.

Such attacks, however, would likely be more of a one-off exception. For the time being, reports of Pakistani-Naxalite cooperation will continue to surface, though this cooperation will probably involve third-party groups that give both Pakistan and the Naxalites plausible deniability. Until we see indications from either the Naxalites or Pakistan that they are willing to establish more robust connections and become more aggressive toward India, a coordinated militant campaign remains unlikely.



Read more: Pakistan and the Naxalite Movement in India | STRATFOR

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Rally against Maoists in their hotbed

KOLKATA: Several political parties and civil groups took out a rally at Banshpahari, located near the West Bengal and Jharkhand border, in West Bengal's Paschim Medinipur district on Wednesday in protest against the persistent Maoist violence in the region.

The Communist Party of India (Marxist), the Jharkhand Anushilan Party and the Gana Pratirodh Committee were the principal participants. The rally was held under the banner of the Vananchal Adhikar Raksha Committee.

Banshpahari and the adjacent Belpahari in West Bengal are notorious for their hilly terrain, which provides a safe haven for Maoists as well as an escape route into the neighbouring Jharkhand during security operations.

“More than 5,000 people assembled at the rally, where the demand to resume normal panchayat activities was made. Due to the ongoing Maoist violence for the last two years, development in the region has been completely stalled,” CPI(M)'s district committee member Dahareswar Sen said.

Pointing out that such a big rally had not been witnessed in the area in the last 12 years, Mr. Sen said it indicated that the locals were fed up with Maoists, contrary to the claim of the extremists.

Positive sign

District Superintendent of Police Pravin Tripathi said it was a positive sign that the local people had started raising their voice against the left-wing extremists.

Teacher turns out to be wanted Maoist

Hyderabad, Nov. 17: Kandula Shirisha, 38, was a play teacher in a home for destitute children in Hyderabad where she has been working for three years.

At Rainbow Home, set up by an NGO with the support of the district collectorate, everyone knew that the single mother — she has a teenage son, Prithvi — had studied up to intermediate and that she was estranged from family and friends because of a personal tragedy.

That was till Monday, when sleuths arrested her in Koraput district on the Andhra-Orissa border and revealed that Shirisha is Padmakka, wife of Maoist top gun Ramakrishna alias Akkiraju Hargopal and a prominent Maoist herself.

Suspected to be involved in many Maoist operations in Andhra and Orissa, Padmakka carried a cash prize of Rs 2 lakh on her head.

She was arrested while on her way to meet her husband, who is unwell, and son in the Narayanpatna forests in Koraput. Orissa police have filed a case of sedition and treason in a local court.

Civil rights activist G. Kalyan Rao, who called on Padma at Koraput jail, disputed the police version that she was arrested on Monday and claimed instead that she was taken into custody by Orissa police near Saluru on November 10, interrogated by Andhra police at Vizianagaram and later handed back to Orissa police.

Revolutionary poet and Maoist sympathiser Vara Vara Rao also contests the police claim that Padmakka, who is also known as Durga and Nirmala, was a Maoist activist and said she was only working in an orphanage in Hyderabad.

“She always avoided being photographed during events in the school-cum-hostel,” the NGO that runs Rainbow said.

Ramakrishna, 45, a central committee member and in charge of the Andhra-Orissa border committee of the Maoists, is alleged to be in a safe hideout in either the Narayanpatna or Bandhugaon blocks in Orissa. Son Prithvi is also with him now, so the Maoists are protecting him zealously, the police said.

Andhra police, who had deployed eight units of the elite commando force Greyhounds to track down Ramakrishna, blame Orissa police for jumping the gun and arresting Padma before she made contact with her husband’s couriers.

Said to be the brain behind eliminating the police network of informers — former activists and tribals — in the Andhra-Orissa border area, Ramakrishna is guarded by a 70-member guerilla military unit and always moves with three rings of security and 10-15 heavily armed personal escorts.

“Under his guidance, the action teams bumped off police informers and tightened movement in the region,” a state intelligence officer said.

He has over 32 cases pending against him, including that of the assassination of Telugu Desam home minister A. Madhav Reddy, whose car was blown up on a state highway when he was on his way to his hometown Bhongir in Nalgonda.

Ramakrishna, part of the Maoist top 10 leaders, had joined the movement in the early ’90s while working as lecturer in a college in Macherla in Guntur district, sources said.

Padmakka, the daughter of a retired state government employee, is also from Guntur, the sources added. She has a sister who was employed with the National Institute of Rural Development in Hyderabad.

After he led the Maoists in the unsuccessful talks with the Andhra Pradesh government in 2004 and narrowly escaped the state police in the Nallamalla forest, Ramakrishna was moved to Orissa and given charge of the border area.

Andhra and Orissa police have deployed 600 CRPF and Greyhound commandos around the Narayanpatna and Bandhugaon forest blocks to catch Ramakrishna and another top gun, Sudhakar. Using GPS and satellite technology, the police tapped Ramakrishna’s calls to followers and aides on a hillock of Narayanpatna, which they have encircled.

Two helicopters have been kept on standby for immediate action in the coming days.

Anticipating a police attack, the Maoists leaked information on landmine and claymore explosives around the Narayanpatna forests, leading about 100 Greyhound commandos to withdraw in the past couple of days, sources said. The Maoists also blasted a police station at Kathirigumma in Koraput to divert attention.

“Landmine threats are keeping the forces at bay as Ramakrishna and his associates are still holed up in the border areas,” said an inspector-general rank officer camping at Visakhapatnam to supervise anti-Naxalite operations.

The police have set up checkposts on forest routes to Chhattisgarh (Narayanapatna-Raigarh-Sambalpur) and Bengal (Srikakulam-Parlakamidi-Behrampore).

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Sexual abuse and mental tortured ' women Maoist surrenders

TNN, Nov 17, 2010, 01.38am IST

Article
Comments



Tags:Sexual Abuse Of Maoist|Maoist|Lalgarh Movement|Kishan

BANKURA: Alleging sexual abuse and mental torture in the hands of her comrades, a woman Maoist squad member surrendered before Bankura SP Pranab Kumar on Tuesday.

Rumpa Mahato alias Sujata surrendered with a 9mm pistol, 11 cartridges and plenty of revolutionary' literature at the SP's office. The daughter of a daily labourer at Majurkata village in West Midnapore's Salboni, Rumpa told the SP that she had been lured by Maoists about two years ago from her home with the promise of work. The 21-year-old is a Class VIII dropout.

Rumpa said she initially liked the Maoists' mission' and willingly went along with them. In her confessions to the SP, Rumpa said: "I met Kishanji. I also had several interactions with Maoist squad leaders Bikash and Bikram at arms training sessions. I was involved in several Maoist operations, mainly in Nayagram and Gopiballavpur. I also participated in the Lalgarh movement of the Maoists."

But Rumpa said she was being physically and mentally tortured by the male squad members for many days now. "I could no longer bear this torture," she said. She also grew disillusioned with the Maoist movement and described the ongoing killings by the ultras as "anti-social activities".

The SP said Rumpa's statements would be verified. "She seems to be suffering from fear psychosis. She was involved in many incidents and we are cross-checking her statement with West Midnapore police," said Kumar.



Read more: Tortured' Maoist surrenders - The Times of India http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kolkata-/Tortured-Maoist-surrenders/articleshow/6938448.cms#ixzz15VIUnz5q

Recruitment in CPF

18:27 IST
Recruitment of Constable (GD) in Central Para Military Forces is being conducted as per scheme issued by MHA, in which 60% of vacancies are being allotted amongst all states/UTs on the basis of population ratio, 20% vacancies are allotted to border districts falling within the area of responsibility of Border Guarding Forces (BGFs) and 20% vacancies in Border Guarding Forces are allotted to the militancy affected area (i.e. J&K, North Eastern States and Naxal affected areas) as notified by the Government from time to time. In Forces other then BGFs, 40% vacancies are allotted to militancy-affected areas (i.e. J&K, North Eastern States and Naxal affected areas). The recruitment in CPMFs is being conducted on a regular basis. Recruitment from border areas is also being made as per the provisions mentioned above.

. This was stated by the Minister of State in the Ministry of Home Affairs, Shri Ajay Maken in written reply to a question in the Lok Sabha today.

Orphanage worker Padma is booked for waging war

TNN, Nov 17, 2010, 04.21am IST

PARVATHIPURAM/KORAPUT: The Koraput police filed criminal conspiracy cases against Kandula Sireesha alias Padma, wife of top Maoist leader Ramakrishna alias RK, and three of her associates who were arrested in Dudari forest area in Naryanapatna block on Sunday afternoon.

They were booked under section of 120-B (waging war against state) of Criminal Conspiracy Act, sections 18, 20 of Unlawful Activities (amendment) Act, section 17 of Criminal Law Amendment Act (propagating financing, supplying either direct or indirect waging war against governments of India and Orissa), sections 121, 121 A of IPC (waging war against government and state) and sections 122 and 124 of IPC.

Nihar Ranjan Nayak, advocate of Padma and others, told TOI that he would be filing a bail petition on Thursday as Wednesday is a holiday for the court on account of Bakrid. "If the sessions court rejects our bail petition, we would move a petition in the higher courts," he said.

Civil rights activist and former Virasam president G Kalyana Rao met Padma, his wife's sister, at the Koraput central prison on Tuesday evening. Kalyana Rao claimed that Padma was arrested near Saluru on November 10. "Naxal Iswari of Vizag was arrested on Nov. 12 somewhere near Saluru by the Andhra police," he said. They were shifted to Viziangaram for two days for interrogation and later handed over to the Orissa police. "While shifting Iswari from Saluru to Vizianagaram, the cops blindfolded her and even beat her up," he alleged.

Earlier, speaking in Visakhapatnam, Kalyana Rao said Padma was not connected with the activities of Maoist party. "She was only going to meet her ailing husband. There is no law which prevents a wife from meeting her ailing husband," he said. He said there were no cases against Padma or the arrested persons who were accompanying her.

Padma, who studied up to Intermediate, was brought up by Kalyana Rao and his wife and as recently as two weeks back Padma visited Kalyana Rao's house in Prakasam district, sources said. Kalyana Rao asserted that she had always been with them or in Hyderabad where she worked in an orphanage.

He said Padma's son Prithvi was also nurtured by him during his early years. Asked about the photographs of Padma in militia fatigues, he said it was possible that her photo in those pictures might have been morphed.

Meanwhile, a police station was set on fire by the Maoists in Koraput district in protest against the arrest of Padma. Over 40 Maoists ransacked the Kakirigumma police station late on Monday night and set on fire records and torched a police jeep. The guerrillas also damaged furniture.


Read more: Orphanage worker Padma is booked for waging war - The Times of India http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/hyderabad/Orphanage-worker-Padma-is-booked-for-waging-war/articleshow/6938279.cms#ixzz15VIA6EsA

Four hardcore Naxalites held

TNN, Nov 17, 2010, 02.40am IST



PATNA: The Munger police arrested four hardcore Naxalites with arms and Naxal-literature after a stiff encounter with them that lasted for over an hour at Gobadda hills at Kharagpur on Tuesday.

The Munger SP said that two extremists were reportedly injured in the encounter in which the police fired 50 rounds. Massive manhunt has been launched to arrest the Maoists, he said. They have been identified as Dharo (Lakhisarai), Sunna and Sanjay (Munger) and Anil Yadav (Jamui), he said.

The SP said that the arrested Naxalites were involved in Kajra Hills encounter in Lakhisarai district in late August, Sangrampur block blast and burning of some campaign vehicles.


Read more: Four hardcore Naxalites held - The Times of India http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/patna/Four-hardcore-Naxalites-held/articleshow/6937896.cms#ixzz15VHxZ9e8

Greyhounds in Koraput in search of RK

Express News Service First Published : 16 Nov 2010 04:42:18 AM ISTLast Updated : 16 Nov 2010 11:08:03 AM IST

HYDERABAD/BHUBANESWAR: A day after the Orissa Police arrested Padma, wife of top Maoist leader Ramakrishna alias RK, the Andhra Pradesh Police on Monday denied speculation that her husband was also picked up.

A team from AP’s elite anti-Naxal force, Greyhounds, is in Koraput, where Padma was arrested, to gather information about the whereabouts of RK, the CPI (Maoist) central committee member and Andhra-Orissa-border (AOB) special zonal committee general secretary.

They were present during her interrogation basing on which a joint combing operation was launched along the Andhra-Orissaborder (AOB) to nab RK and his son Prithvi alias Munna, said to be a section commander in the newlyformed CPI (Maoist) central regional committee (CRC). The CRC is the third such unit of AOB and includes Srikakulam and Koraput divisions.

Though Padma didn’t reveal “operational” details, the police are believed to have collected vital inputs about RK’s movements in the forest areas of Parvathipuram, Bandhugaon and Narayanpatna. It was towards Narayanpatna that Padma was headed when she was arrested. Police sources said the Orissa team that nabbed Padma and a few others on Sunday came to know of their background only after interrogating them. “Had the Orissa police known their identities, they would have tracked them for some more time to get to RK,” a source said.

However, a police official of Orissa, on condition of anonymity, said beyond the point where Padma was arrested, movement was impossible without raising an alarm. There have been regular inputs about RK’s movements along the AOB, especially Narayanpatna and Malkangiri areas.

But, unlike the well-trained AP police, who use intelligence network to tail Maoist leaders for several days and hunt them down, their counterparts in Orissa do not appear to have gained a similar experience despite the heightened Maoist activity in the State, especially Koraput division. In fact, the police described the situation there as more or less similar to Dantewada.

“The Maoists there are operating through an organisation modelled on the lines of the Rytu Coolie Sangham that existed in AP in the past. The level of militancy is quite high,” a source said. Meanwhile, Padma and her associates have been remanded in judicial custody.

Greyhounds in Koraput in search of RK

Express News Service First Published : 16 Nov 2010 04:42:18 AM ISTLast Updated : 16 Nov 2010 11:08:03 AM IST

HYDERABAD/BHUBANESWAR: A day after the Orissa Police arrested Padma, wife of top Maoist leader Ramakrishna alias RK, the Andhra Pradesh Police on Monday denied speculation that her husband was also picked up.

A team from AP’s elite anti-Naxal force, Greyhounds, is in Koraput, where Padma was arrested, to gather information about the whereabouts of RK, the CPI (Maoist) central committee member and Andhra-Orissa-border (AOB) special zonal committee general secretary.

They were present during her interrogation basing on which a joint combing operation was launched along the Andhra-Orissaborder (AOB) to nab RK and his son Prithvi alias Munna, said to be a section commander in the newlyformed CPI (Maoist) central regional committee (CRC). The CRC is the third such unit of AOB and includes Srikakulam and Koraput divisions.

Though Padma didn’t reveal “operational” details, the police are believed to have collected vital inputs about RK’s movements in the forest areas of Parvathipuram, Bandhugaon and Narayanpatna. It was towards Narayanpatna that Padma was headed when she was arrested. Police sources said the Orissa team that nabbed Padma and a few others on Sunday came to know of their background only after interrogating them. “Had the Orissa police known their identities, they would have tracked them for some more time to get to RK,” a source said.

However, a police official of Orissa, on condition of anonymity, said beyond the point where Padma was arrested, movement was impossible without raising an alarm. There have been regular inputs about RK’s movements along the AOB, especially Narayanpatna and Malkangiri areas.

But, unlike the well-trained AP police, who use intelligence network to tail Maoist leaders for several days and hunt them down, their counterparts in Orissa do not appear to have gained a similar experience despite the heightened Maoist activity in the State, especially Koraput division. In fact, the police described the situation there as more or less similar to Dantewada.

“The Maoists there are operating through an organisation modelled on the lines of the Rytu Coolie Sangham that existed in AP in the past. The level of militancy is quite high,” a source said. Meanwhile, Padma and her associates have been remanded in judicial custody.

Maoists blow up police station in Orissa

Stepping up their attack on police establishments and government structures, armed Maoists blew up a police station in Orissa’s Koraput district, police said today.

Around 30 heavily armed rebels raided the police station at Kakiriguma, about 40 km from here, around last mid-night and triggered a powerful explosion to blow up the structure, Laxmipur SDPO Y Jagannath Rao said.

Shouting slogans against the government and security forces, the ultras also torched a police jeep parked in the premises before disappearing into nearby forest, he said.

However, the Maoists did not harm anyone in course of their attack. The lone sentry manning the police station escaped as he reportedly fled the scene after sighting the marauding extremists.

Police reinforcement had rushed to the spot, while combing operation and patrolling intensified in the area to nab the ultras.

Keywords: Orissa, Maoists, Police station, Attack

Orissa: BSF extends helping hand to villagers in Malkangiri

Report by Deba Prasad Dash; Malkangiri: Realising the paramount importance of the socio-economic issues that needs to be redressed at this juncture and to continue its mission of good will gesture in rural and Maoist infested areas of the Malkangiri district state, 107 Battalion of the Border Security Forces (BSF) deployed at Balimela were recently conducted Civic Action Programmes at various cut-off villages such as Mantriput, Rajalkonda, Chitrakonda, Balimela, Orkel, Gudmulgumma, Khirput etc.

This unique programme evoked good response from the tribal villagers who attened the camps held recently.They were distributed various items such as Note Books, Umbrella, School Bags, Uniform, Shoes, Geometry Boxes, Pens, Agricultural tools, Utensils, Stationary items, Electrical items, Sanitary items, Medicine etc to villagers.

Aiming at extending a helping hand to the poor tribal villagers residing in the interior and remote areas, the C' Coy, 107 Battalion was organized a multipurpose camp in Despahi Primary School and Sisu Mandir and Govt High School premises at Chitrakonda recently and 107 Battalion BSF Offg Commandant Raj Kumar, Assistant Commdant R.Sekhar, Chitrakonda Tehsildar D.Gopal Krishnan,IIC R.Chhatria and distributed various school items of worth Rs. 25,000/- to 50,000/- on the occasion.

The BSF officials with the support of the local officials there sorted out certain problems on the spot and wrote to the concerned officials to take up the issues. The local people appreciated the good will activities of BSF 107th Battalion and highlighted the role of BSF in insurgency areas.

During Civic Action they used to interact with villagers along with State Govt authorities such as Tehsildar, Inspector-in-Charges of various police stations, Block Development Officers, Junior Engineers etc to sort out the various problems of villagers. The BSF has plans to organise such good will programmes at various places in Chitrakonda area for the welfare of the poor tribal villagers, said the BSF officials. The programme is aimed at to improve education and life standard of poor villagers in cut off areas, they added.

Maoist leader in Bihar sentenced to 10 years imprisonment

Published: Tuesday, Nov 16, 2010, 19:27 IST
Place: Banka | Agency: PTI

A local court today sentenced a Maoist leader to 10 years imprisonment for looting arms and ammunition from police in 2007.

The fast track court judge SC Srivastava also slapped a fine of Rs50,000 on Arvind Kumar Yadav alias Raju Da Yadav for looting four rifles and ten cartridges from policemen Turki More in Banka district on November 23, 2007.

The looted arms were later recovered from Chirauta village under Belhar police station area, according to the prosecution.

Two suspected Naxalites arrested in Jharkhand

Press Trust Of India
Dhanbad/Gumla, November 16, 2010First Published: 20:51 IST(16/11/2010)
Last Updated: 20:52 IST(16/11/2010)

Two suspected Naxalites were arrested on Tuesday in different districts of Jharkhand. A suspected Naxalite was caught during a routine check in Sadar police station in Dhanbad when the police caught him and allegedly found a note which read "Boycott Panchayat elections". The police were


interrogating him to know which extremist group he belonged to.
The polling to rural bodies begins on November 27 and will be held in five phases.

Another suspected activist of People's Liberation Front of India was caught at a place in Gumla's Ghargra police station, Gumla district police chief N K Singh told newsmen there.

He said the Naxalite was identified as Lalit Oraon and 'confessed' that he belonged to the banned PLFI outfit.

A country-made double-barrel gun was seized from him, he said.

Six Naxalites have been arrested in Gumla this month.

Monday, November 15, 2010

Commandos set to take charge soon

TNN, Nov 15, 2010, 09.44pm IST



Tags:National Security Guards|Karnataka Police Academy

MYSORE: The elite commando force, which has been constituted by the state to counter terrorism, will start functioning shortly, said home minister R Ashoka. He was speaking on the sidelines of laying of the foundation for the administrative block of Karnataka Police Academy on Monday.

He said the force has been formed on the lines of ( National Security Guards) NSG to tackle terrorism and naxal issues in the state. A total of 300 police personnel drawn from different wings are trained in various aspects.

As we cant wait for security forces from the Centre during emergency situations, we have made special arrangements to deal with the future security challenges in Karnataka, Ashoka said, adding that a brigadier-level officer (retired) of the Indian Army will head the commando group for three years.

FOCUS ON CONSTABULARY
My first priority is to improve standards of constables and head constables, who are chiefly responsible for maintaining law and order in the state, the minister said, replying to a query. Besides this, they will also focus on providing education to their children and adequate ration to the families. On the occasion, the minister disclosed plans to increase the number of police quarters by three-fold.

NAXAL MENACE
Ashoka also warned the Naxalites saying the police force is ready to take stringent steps against naxals if they do not shun violence. The government is committed to rehabilitate those who desist from naxal activities by providing jobs and shelter to them. In a democratic set-up, people have the opportunity to protest peacefully, but if anyone takes the path of violence, they will be dealt with an iron hand, the minister stated.

ADMINISTRATIVE BLOCK AT KPA
Briefing reporters about the new establishment at KPA, Ashoka said the administrative block is coming up at a cost of Rs 2.69 crore. The two-storeyed building will have a total built-up area of 24,000 sqft. A community hall will also be built in the area at a cost of Rs 2.7 crore. The government wants to make the police training academy a model centre in the country. We have set aside Rs 13 lakh for a basketball court, Rs 63 lakh for a hostel and seminar hall, Rs 2 crore to repair building blocks at KPA, Rs 3 crore to procure advanced training equipment and Rs 1 crore to purchase arms and ammunition, the minister stated.

The Karnataka Police Academy will shortly start implementing rainwater harvesting on its premises, he said.


Read more: Commandos set to take charge soon - The Times of India http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mysore/Commandos-set-to-take-charge-soon/articleshow/6931597.cms#ixzz15QE5NZ4n

India 15th on terror risk list

November 16th, 2010
DC Correspondent


London, Nov. 15: India has been categorised as an “extreme risk” nation in the index of global terror risk led by Somalia.

Somalia experienced 556 terrorist incidents, killing a total of 1,437 people and wounding 3,408 between June 2009 and June 2010. It dropped from 4 to 1 in this year’s index to become the world’s terrorism hotspot.

Risk of terrorist attacks in India may be lower than that in Top 5 extreme risk terror-hit nations — Somalia, Pakistan, Iraq, Afghanistan and Occupied Palestinian Terrorities — but it is still in the 15th place in a global ranking that annually assesses the frequency and intensity of terrorist incidents in 196 countries.
“India experienced a total of 749 terrorist incidents between June 2009 and June 2010. This compares to 775 terrorist attacks between June 2008 and 2009, a year previously. Levels of terrorism in India have thus remained constant and the country’s ranking has remained in the extreme risk category,” the index explained.
India experienced a significant number of mass-casualty attacks — 127 attacks resulted in 100 or more fatalities.

India is facing threat from Islamist violence and from the Naxalites, who claim to be fighting for greater social justice for India’s rural poor, the report on the index explained.

The Naxals were believed to have been behind another train derailment in May 2010 in West Midnapore district in West Bengal. The derailment killed 148 and injured 200 or more people.

Wife of wanted maoist along with 3 cadres arrested in Orissa




Video: Asian News International (ANI)

Kishenji's death news a ploy to dilute anti-Naxal ops'

Press Trust Of India
Jamshedpur, November 14, 2010First Published: 22:34 IST(14/11/2010)
Last Updated: 22:36 IST(14/11/2010)

Jharkhand police on Sunday said the recent poster, recovered in West Bengal, alluding the death of CPI (Maoist) leader Kishenji could be a ploy of the outfit to dilute the operations against the rebels. "I do not not rule out the possibility that it could be a Maoist ploy to divert the ongoing


operation," DIG (Kolhan) Navin Kumar Singh said.
Had he been died, it would have attracted reactions within the outfit like it did when its top-ranking leader Azad was killed in an encounter in Andhra Pradesh, Singh said.

The poster recovered from Lalgarh police station area on Friday referred Kishenji as 'Saheed' (Martyr).

"One of the Maoist politburo members, who was arrested in West Singhbhum district recently, has not said anything on Kishanji during interrogation," he said.

The DIG, who led anti-Naxal operation for five days in Saranda forest of West Singhbhum in September where an encounter took place, denied that Kishanji was present there.

A second-ranked Maoist leader Prasant Bose alias Kishan'da was present and leading his men against the securitymen, he said.

High Alert For Naxal Bandh Call

High alert has been sounded on the Andhra-Orissa border following a bandh call by Naxals over arrest of their leader's wife.

15th Nov, 2010: Following the 2-day bandh call issued by Maoists in protest against the arrest of top Maoist Ramakrishna's wife Padma by the Orissa police in Koraput district on Sunday, a high alert has been sounded on the Andhra-Orissa border regions, and Superintendents Of Police of Vizianagaram, Srikakulam and Visakhapatnam districts were asked to be on their toes.

The Orissa police arrested Padma when she visited the Andhra-Orissa border to meet her husband Ramakrishna, also known as R K. R K is suffering from high fever.

Along with Padma, the police also took into custody a casual labourer of the Guntur Municipal Corporation named Antony, his wife Eswari, and one Punni, and seized some incriminating documents from them.

The arrestees were produced in Koraput court on Monday, and were remanded to 14-day police custody.

Meanwhile, the police also intensified combing on the Andhra-Orissa border, and deployed helicopters to patrol the Maoist- infested areas. The helicopters are scouring the forests to identify the Maoists dens, according to sources.

The police is taking the assistance of paramilitary forces and Central Reserve Police Forces in their combing operations to arrest Maoist leader Ramakrishna and AOB chief Maoist Surender. The government has already announced a reward of Rs. 12 lakh on the Maoist's head.

Courtesy: INN

Karnataka to have special Commando Force

BY Team Mangalorean Mysore

Mysore, Nov 15: Karnataka will soon constitute a special commando force to face any challenges from anti-social elements, Home Minister R Ashok said today.

Speaking to newsmen here, he said the special commando force with 300 members was given special training to handle all kinds of situation, including terrorist and naxal activities, besides communal clashes. People with special skills have been selected to the force, trained under the National Security Force and Central Reserve Forces.

He said a retired top Army official had been taken on contract basis for three years to oversee the entire force, he added.

Referring to naxal activities in the state, he said the department had taken necessary steps to prevent naxal activities.

"We are taking all possible steps and keeping a strict vigil on naxal movements. The government's main aim is to curb all activities including the naxal and terrorist activities," he said.

He said it was decided to increase intelligence system in the naxal-infested areas besides mounting strict vigil. The government was also planning bring in a change in the life of naxals who had surrendered before the police with complete rehabilitation to bring them into the mainstream. If these measures fail then the police would take its own course of action against any kind of naxal movement in the state, he warned.

Karnataka to have special Commando Force

BY Team Mangalorean Mysore

Mysore, Nov 15: Karnataka will soon constitute a special commando force to face any challenges from anti-social elements, Home Minister R Ashok said today.

Speaking to newsmen here, he said the special commando force with 300 members was given special training to handle all kinds of situation, including terrorist and naxal activities, besides communal clashes. People with special skills have been selected to the force, trained under the National Security Force and Central Reserve Forces.

He said a retired top Army official had been taken on contract basis for three years to oversee the entire force, he added.

Referring to naxal activities in the state, he said the department had taken necessary steps to prevent naxal activities.

"We are taking all possible steps and keeping a strict vigil on naxal movements. The government's main aim is to curb all activities including the naxal and terrorist activities," he said.

He said it was decided to increase intelligence system in the naxal-infested areas besides mounting strict vigil. The government was also planning bring in a change in the life of naxals who had surrendered before the police with complete rehabilitation to bring them into the mainstream. If these measures fail then the police would take its own course of action against any kind of naxal movement in the state, he warned.

Sunday, November 14, 2010

Centre has planned Anti-Naxal Funds audits

The Centre has planned audits to find out whether state governments have properly used funds given to them for combating Maoists.

A request for proposal (RFP) for a comprehensive study of fund use has recently been floated by ministry of home affairs.

The organisation that gets selected to do this work would have to get ground-level feedback about the utilisation of central funds.

Under the central reimbursement scheme, Maoist-affected states are paid for the costs incurred on anti-Maoist operations. This includes money spent for paying compensation to civilians, setting up of village defence committees, rehabilitation of hardcore, underground Maoist cadre, propaganda and logistics for fighting Maoists forces.

The study will check the speed of fund use, the security environment created by the states for optimum utilisation, and the effect the anti-Maoist scheme has had on the morale of security forces.

The central scheme has been running for the past eight years in the Maoist-affected states of Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Orissa, Punjab, Tamil Nadu, Uttaranchal, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal.

A total of 81 districts across nine states are covered under this scheme. Andhra Pradesh and Bihar have 15 districts each for which the Centre dispenses money. Three districts from Maharashtra - Chandrapur, Gadchiroli and Gondia also get cover.

As per the RFP, “All districts in Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal will be reviewed whereas in the remaining states the study would be required to review just 50 % of districts.

Two women Maoists surrender in Orissa

2010-11-14 22:20:00

Two women Maoists surrendered with arms before the State police in Orissa's Kendujhar District on Sunday.

Savita Munda, one of the Maoists, said that she took the decision of quitting the ultra group due to being subjected to harassment in the Maoist camp.

"We thought that Maoists are attached to a noble cause. But after working with them for 14 years, we have realised that they have given up their ideology. They are now involved in other kinds of activities. Leaders, who are outsiders, conduct these activities. They come here and take the money. They used to harness us both physically and mentally," said Munda.

She also surrendered a country-made pistol and cartridges.

According to police officials, Munda was an active member of the Gorilla squad and was involved in various violence activities, including murder.

"One of the arrested is Savita Munda, who is 20, she was the member of Kalinga Nagar Sub-Divisional Committee of the Maoists. She was an active member and was involved in various violent activities in Orissa. She was also a part of Nayagarh violence, various loots, murders and has been appointed by Maoist leaders," said Yaswant Jethua, Deputy Inspector General, Kendujhar.

Initially, the Maoists contended they are fighting for the cause of poor and weaker sections of the society whereas over the past two decades, they have turned extremely violent. (ANI)

AP police find incriminating documents at Hem Pandey's house

Rakhi Chakrabarty, TNN, Nov 15, 2010, 04.03am IST

NEW DELHI: A raid by Andhra Pradesh police at the Shastri Nagar house of journalist Hem Chandra Pandey, killed along with Maoist spokesperson Azad in an encounter in Adilabad forest, yielded piles of Maoist literature, documents, CDs and letters.

The contents of the CDs couldn't be read though. They seem to be encrypted, said sources. The bound volumes were meant for internal circulation among the CPI-Maoist members. The AP police team seized 68 copies of Maoist financial policy, 210 copies of the banned outfit's cadre policy, 66 copies of Maoist strategy and tactics, 63 copies of `Political Resolution', 103 copies of `Peoples War: Political Organ of CPI-Maoist' and 246 copies of `CPI-Maoist: Ideology and Preface'.

Around 500 copies of `Shahari Kaam ke Baare Mein' in Hindi, detailing Maoist activities, strategy and propaganda in urban areas, came as a revelation. There were also 46 copies of the English version of the document. Documents on Maoist war strategy and field manual and the People's Liberation Army are expected to provide insights about the outfit.

In addition, sources claimed, the AP police team found documents on anti- personnel mines and a document detailing `How to use handgun' during the raid at the second floor apartment where the Pandeys had rented on February 7. Pandey was killed in the encounter on July 2. His wife Babita alias Binita Pandey left the house on July 2 and hasn't returned since.

Babita said, "I had told the landlady to rent out the apartment if she wanted and keep my stuff with her." She plans to file a writ petition in Supreme Court seeking a probe into the encounter where Pandey was killed.

Armed with a search warrant from Delhi's Tis Hazari court, the AP police broke open the lock of the apartment. Raj Bala, landlady of the A-96 house where the Pandeys lived, her son Vikas and neighbours were taken as witnesses by the AP police team before they entered the two-room apartment.

Speaking to TOI, Pankaj Gupta, a neighbour who was also a witness, said, "The AP police team broke the lock to enter the apartment in front of me. I was present throughout while the police searched the house."

Slamming the raid, Pandey's wife Babita on Sunday said, "This is a malicious propaganda by Andhra police to hide the fact that they had killed my husband." She said this was an attempt by the AP police to harass her. "Without taking my permission, the police raided our house and now they are showing the seizure of objectionable things from the house," she said.

She denied she had given a wrong address to the AP police when she had gone to claim Pandey's body. An AP police officer claimed Babita gave them the Shastri Nagar address only after she was questioned on September 30 at Swami Aginivesh's Delhi office.

About the documents found in her house, she said, "Hem was deeply interested in literature and politics. The claim that there were secret documents in my house is completely baseless."


Read more: AP police find incriminating documents at Hem Pandey's house - The Times of India http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/hyderabad/AP-police-find-incriminating-documents-at-Hem-Pandeys-house/articleshow/6926534.cms#ixzz15KTUD06F

Clue to kidnapped cop found in Maoist camp

TNN, Nov 15, 2010, 03.50am IST

PURULIA/MIDNAPORE: The duo abducted by the Maoists Partha Biswas and Saumyajit Basu might have been kept captive at the Mugurma camp in Purulia's Ayodhya hills till recently.

Two days after an encounter between the Red rebels and security forces at Mugurma left two ultras dead, an official document belonging to Biswas, a State Armed Police inspector on deputation to the Intelligence Branch, was found among the materials seized by the police from the abandoned camp. The paper bore the signature of the Purulia SP, with the date October 13, which was nine days before Biswas and his friend Basu went mysteriously missing during a trip to Ayodhya hills.

Two days back, an encounter broke out at the Maoists' Mugurma camp in Ayodhya hills. After two of their comrades fell to the security forces' bullets, the remaining ultras fled. They left behind blankets, diaries, bags, posters and Maoist literature.

For the last two days, the district police were busy with the preparation for chief minister Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee's public meeting at Balarampur on Sunday afternoon. Finally, when they were rummaging through the contents of the bags on Sunday, they found the document.

The family members of the missing duo have sat on a dharna at Metro Channel, met chief minister Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee and Trinamool chief Mamata Banerjee separately and made repeated appeals for the safe return of the two. But there has been no trace of the duo so far.

"The finding has reconfirmed our suspicion that Maoists were behind the abduction," a senior officer said.

Later on Sunday, in Shirshi village near Midnapore town, two supporters of the Maoist-backed People's Committee against Police Atrocities (PCPA) were found dead. PCPA has blamed the murders on the CPM. Nibaran Singh and Sushil Mahato, both hailing from Beldanga, were shot dead.


Read more: Clue to kidnapped cop found in Maoist camp - The Times of India http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kolkata-/Clue-to-kidnapped-cop-found-in-Maoist-camp/articleshow/6926626.cms#ixzz15KTK7lXM

Maoist strike shuts down two Orissa districts

Indo-Asian News Service
Bhubaneswar, November 15, 2010First Published: 10:40 IST(15/11/2010)
Last Updated: 10:42 IST(15/11/2010)


A one-day strike called by Maoists saw buses staying off the roads and shops downing shutters in two districts of Orissa on Monday, police said. The Communist Party of India-Maoist (CPI-Maoist) called for the strike in Malkangiri and parts of Koraput district after four of their cadres were gunned


down by police Nov 4. The incident took place in Karlakuta village of Malkangiri, about 600 km from here. Maoists have claimed that the four killed were innocent villagers.
Both private and government bus operators kept their vehicles off the roads as a preventive measure, a senior police officer told IANS.

"Fearing attacks, shops have also downed their shutters in several places," he said.

"Security has been beefed up across the region. Additional forces have been deployed in strategic locations. No untoward incidents have been reported from any places so far," he added.

Maoists blow up bridge in Bihar

Aurangabad: Maoists blew up a bridge near Karma Lahan village in Bihar's Aurangabad district, police said.



The ultras triggered a dynamite blast blowing up the bridge late last night, the police said, adding, no casualty was reported.

A combing operation has been launched against naxalites in the area, they said.

Purulia`s Ayodhya hills a safe haven for Maoists’

Balarampur (WB): West Bengal Chief Minister Buddhadeb Bhattacharjee today said the Ayodhya hills in Purulia district have become a safe haven for Maoists and asked police to remove the ultras from hideouts there.

"Maoists are hiding in the jungles of Ayodhya hills. From there, they are carrying out killings in Balarampur, Arsha and Jhalda. I have asked the police to weed them out of the Ayodhya hills and to ensure that they cannot stay there," he said at a public meeting here. Bhattacharjee`s directive came as Intelligence Branch officer Partha Biswas and NGO worker Soumyajit Basu, who were kidnapped from the hills on October 22, were yet to be traced.

He claimed that Maoists had killed 42 CPI(M) activists at Balarampur, Baghmundi and Arsha in the recent past and of these, 23 were killed in Balarampur alone.

"I have received letters from school girls who have complained that they were afraid to go to school because they were being threatened by Maoists on their way. Shall we tolerate this? We shall have to resist them at all costs," Bhattacharjee said. Referring to the kidnapping of Biswas and Basu, the Chief Minister said, "Maoists have kidnapped them. Today is November 14, but still there is no trace of them. We are trying our best to rescue them alive."

Accusing Maoists of trying to usurp power in the state and the Centre, the chief minister said his government would not allow the ultras to raise their heads.

"I have asked the police to see that Maoists cannot raise their heads in Purulia, Bankura and West Midnapore," he said.

Calling upon the people to unite against Maoists, Bhattacharjee said the ultras cannot face the united resistance of the people just as the Naxalite movement dissipated in the face of public resistance.

"Let us pledge that we will not allow Maoists to raise their heads. The government will stand by you with all its power," he told the gathering.

Bhattacharjee charged the Trinamool Congress with holding the hands of Maoists as it was unable to defeat the Left Front politically.

"Maoists are not only killing CPI(M) workers. They are also killing those belonging to the Forward Bloc, the CPI and RSP. As the Trinamool Congress cannot defeat the Leftists politically, it stands to gain if activists of the Left parties are killed," Bhattacharjee alleged.

PTI

Mobile courts to be introduced in naxalite prone areas

AGARTALA: Mobile courts would soon be introduced in Panchayats, specially in Naxalite infested areas, to instill confidence among the people about the availability of justice, Union Minister for Law and Justice M Virappa Moily today said.

Inaugurating a new High Court building for Tripura here, Moily said, "We have trouble in Naxalite infested areas and have decided to introduce mobile courts which will dispose off cases within six months. This will instill confidence among the common people".

The mobile courts, he said, would function like gramin nyayalayas which would dispose off cases within six months.

There would be one mobile court for five/six panchayats, Moily said.

Every panchayat would be sanctioned upto Rs 18 lakh for construction of a court building, he said.

Gramin Nyayalaya (rural courts) were functioning well in Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan, the minister said.

Claiming that Indian Judiciary was independent and best in the world, Moily said, it however needed modern reforms with introduction of modern technology so that it could deliver verdicts faster.

No case should be pending for more than three years, he said.

The Law minister said Judicial Standard and Accountability Bill would be placed in parliament in the next month to make judiciary more transparent.

Replying to a question, he refused to comment on spectrum scandal or Telecom Minister, A Raja saying the case was pending in the Supreme court .